The Security State Crushes Ever Tighter

by craig on February 19, 2014 9:29 am in Uncategorized

The disgraceful judges of Britain’s High Court – who have gone along with torture, extraordinary rendition, every single argument for mass surveillance and hiding information from the public, and even secret courts – have ruled that it was lawful for the Home Office to detain David Miranda, a journalist as information he was carrying might in some undefined way, and if communicated to them, aid “terrorists”.

Despite the entire industry, both private and governmental, devoted to whipping up fear, it is plain to pretty well everyone by now that terrorism is about the most unlikely way for you to die.  A car accident is many hundreds of times more likely.  Even drowning in your own bath is more likely.  Where is the massive industry of suppression against baths?

I had dinner inside the Ecuadorian Embassy on Sunday with Julian Assange, who I am happy to say is as fit and well as possible in circumstances of confinement.  Amongst those present was Jesselyn Radack, attorney for, among others, Edward Snowden.  Last week on entering the UK she was pulled over by immigration and interrogated about her clients.  The supposed “immigration officer” already knew who are Jesselyn Radack’s clients.  He insisted aggressively on referring repeatedly to Chelsea Manning as a criminal, to which Jesselyn quietly replied that he was a political prisoner.  But even were we to accept the “immigration officer’s” assertion, the fact that an attorney defends those facing criminal charges is neither new nor until now considered reprehensible and illegitimate.

As various states slide towards totalitarianism, a defining factor is that their populations really don’t notice.  Well, I have noticed.  Have you?

 

 

 

Tweet this post

496 Comments

1 2 3 5

  1. Hello Craig, good to see you again. Yes, I’ve noticed.

  2. Hi Clark,

    sent email to you ask whether it is possible to get the twitter feed working and tweet this one. Can you help?

  3. I’ll check my e-mail.

  4. http://www.vineyardsaker.blogspot.mx/2014/02/creeping-fascism-or-maybe-its-just-me.html?m=1

    Yes but you only the violence in society also needs addressing. We are so stupid that what is seen on our screens is inherent in our lives. We are what we consume.
    For me is a worry.

  5. And we see ‘terrorism’ continually redefined. In the US the push is to make it mean doing harm to a company’s profits (by say exposing aminal abuse).

    Its now clear that facilitating copyright infringement (ie Pirate Bay etc) is also now considered terrorism by the ‘security’ services. We are in a more and more explicit state of corporate capitalism and to keep it going more and more totalitarians measures are needed.

  6. We are all terrorists.

  7. Craig, I’ve replied by e-mail.

  8. The truth is bad news in the new world

  9. Yes we did notice. An outrage. If they can treat a human rights lawyer like this, what chance do the rest of us stand?

    On the previous thread.

    ~~~
    Mary 18 Feb, 2014 – 2:48 pm

    Mrs May’s bastards this time.

    Heathrow Customs Agent Interrogates Snowden Lawyer
    ‘Why Have You Gone to Russia Three Times in Two Months?’

    By Kevin Gosztola

    February 17 2014 “Information Clearing House – “Firedoglake” – A lawyer who represents National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden and has spoken on his behalf numerous times was detained while going through customs at Heathrow airport in London.

    Jesselyn Radack told Firedoglake she was directed to a specific Heathrow Border Force agent. He “didn’t seem interested” in her passport. She was then subjected to “very hostile questioning.”

    As Radack recalled, she was asked why she was here. “To see friends,” she answered. “Who will you be seeing?” She answered, “A group called Sam Adams Associates.”

    The agent wanted to know who was in the group. “Ray McGovern, Annie Machon, Thomas Drake, Craig Murray,” she answered. She said she is part of the group as well.

    “Where will you meet?” Radack answered, “At the Ecuadorian Embassy.” Then, the agent asked, “With Julian Assange?” Radack said yes.

    /..
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article37666.htm

    ~~~
    Mary 18 Feb, 2014 – 9:50 pm

    Hear the account of Edward Snowden’s lawyer, Jesselyn Radack, of her treatment at Heathrow on Sunday by the ‘Border Force’. The banality of their bizarre questioning completely unnerved her. Shocking and disgusting. For the record, the interrogation was not done in our name Jesselyn.

    Tuesday, February 18, 2014
    Attorney for Edward Snowden Interrogated at U.K. Airport, Placed on “Inhibited Persons List”
    http://www.democracynow.org/2014/2/18/attorney_for_edward_snowden_interrogated_at?autostart=true&get_clicky_key=suggested_next_story

  10. I noticed that totalitarian groups, including cults, will hide behind ‘sacred cows’, such as feminists and sodomites in the example of the Western ‘democracies’; whilst all the time advocating equality,as though it were liberating, they practice absolute control.

    With no true democratic feedback, the system will not be in equilibrium; and therefore will suffer a positive feedback catastrophe.

  11. Noticed. Thought I was going mad, for a bit. Immensely grateful to have found a few others who’ve noticed, too, and either speak out or try to find alternatives.

  12. JimmyGyro, while I agree with the first point you make to some extent, I object to your use of the pejorative term “sodomites”. What anyone does with their own body is their own business; please keep out of others’ private lives – same for you, same for GCHQ.

    Very good point on positive feedback.

  13. Ba’al Zevul (La Vita è Finita)

    19 Feb, 2014 - 12:08 pm

    Noticed. As others have observed, the terrorists have won. Their aim is to overthrow democracy. Democracy, or its not-terribly-convincing simulacrum here, has obligingly overthrown itself. And the megacorps are loving it.

  14. SAL the GAL, yes, I’ve been doubting my sanity too. Trying to discuss the matter with my real-world friends leads to hostile responses, and they attempt to make me shut up.

    It’s the same here in this comment section. Certain contributors, notable by their absence so far today, aggressively ridicule any other commenter who expresses such an opinion. It would be easy to assume that they have a mission to suppress such opinions, but my real-world experience suggests widespread denial as another possible cause.

  15. @Clark

    Pejorative or not, it is what they do.

    Further, the State has given them fostering rights, facilitated by the secret family courts; so it is not so much a ‘private’ concern, as you suggest, but more of a secret deal.

  16. Ba’al Zevul 12:08 pm

    “the terrorists have won”

    No, terrorist groups have not had their demands addressed. The accusation that terrorist groups wished to overthrow democracy was attributed to them, or at least selectively amplified, by political spokespersons and the corporate media.

  17. JimmyGiro 12:21 pm, you refer to “them”. You could well be referring to me. Please don’t alienate your allies. Divide and Rule is deadly.

  18. Oh yes, noticed.

    I’ve also noticed that no one seems to care. The silence in response to the shocking Snowden revelations is deafening. Essentially, by not protesting against it, the people have signalled to the elites their tacit acceptance.

    Is there anything they won’t accept?

    Although, having said all that, I don’t accept it, but have no idea what to do about it.

  19. Ba’al Zevul (La Vita è Finita)

    19 Feb, 2014 - 12:38 pm

    ‘No, terrorist groups have not had their demands addressed. The accusation that terrorist groups wished to overthrow democracy was attributed to them, or at least selectively amplified, by political spokespersons and the corporate media.’

    I dispute that. Terrorism is simply asymmetric warfare. The intention is to amplify limited means of physical coercion by psychological means. At the outset of the (granted, bogus) War on Terror, we were still able to point to our superior democratic and humanitarian principles, and maybe win a few hearts and minds in the countries concerned. If we attempt to do that now, we are very rightly laughed at. That’s because we’ve abandoned the principles in favour of winning the war. In the process we’ve lost the war. Example: separate and draconian legislation on terrorists. There is nothing a terrorist can do that is not adequately covered by pre-existing legislation. Whether he does it to cause terror or to steal a pensioner’s handbag is immaterial, as regards the perceived requirement for different legislation.

  20. This is off topic but he is part of the UK surveillance society after all and will eventually head it.

    What a pillock. Cavorting with these creatures. Will be visiting/toadying around the Bahrainis or does he leave that part of the arms selling op to the younger brother?

    Prince Charles Joins Sword Dance In Saudi

    Wearing a long flowing robe and headdress, the Prince of Wales takes part in a ceremony celebrating the country’s culture.
    http://news.sky.com/story/1213951/prince-charles-joins-sword-dance-in-saudi

    Totally cringe making.

  21. Ba’al Zevul, 12:38 pm, I agree that terrorism is asymmetric warfare, but, I repeat, such groups have not had their grievances addressed. Illegal Israeli settlement into Palestine continues to proliferate, “Western” military forces continue their activities in the Middle East, drone strikes continue, etc., etc.

  22. Dispatches
    On the UK’s Equating of Journalism with Terrorism

    By Glenn Greenwald 19 Feb 2014,

    (updated below)

    As my colleague Ryan Deveraux reports, a lower U.K. court this morning, as long expected, upheld the legality of the nine-hour detention of my partner, David Miranda, at Heathrow Airport last August, even as it acknowledged that the detention was “an indirect interference with press freedom”. For good measure, the court also refused permission to appeal (though permission can still be granted by the appellate court). David was detained and interrogated under the Terrorism Act of 2000.

    The UK Government expressly argued that the release of the Snowden documents (which the free world calls “award-winning journalism“) is actually tantamount to “terrorism”, the same theory now being used by the Egyptian military regime to prosecute Al Jazeera journalists as terrorists. Congratulations to the UK government on the illustrious company it is once again keeping. British officials have also repeatedly threatened criminal prosecution of everyone involved in this reporting, including Guardian journalists and editors.

    /..

    https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2014/02/19/uks-equating-journalism-terrorism-designed-conceal-gchq/

  23. It appears we were warned in 1968 by futurist Arthur C Clarke in his 2001 Space Odyssey. The totalistic monolith of terror has reached into the very heart of truth and justice spreading a corruption affecting humanity and destined to transmute human evolution.

    2001 sowed a seed of dangerous perfidy that can only lead to disaster crucially evident now, today, in the hiatus of nuclear powers.

    Perhaps only a ‘star child’ can save us from extinction.

  24. Mary, the Saudi aristocracy are not subhuman “creatures”, and what matters about Prince Charles is not that he dances with them, but to what use he puts any influence thereby gained with them.

  25. Ba’al Zevul (La Vita è Finita)

    19 Feb, 2014 - 1:07 pm

    Yes, Clark, granted, but tangential. My view is that terrorism and the activities of the US in the ME – or of Israel in the Occupied Territories – are symbiotic entities – each knowingly feeds on the other(1). Grievances are addressed by both with bombs and bullets. We are now in a state of moral equivalence with the entities we demonise. Which is what they wanted.

    (1) And where would Israel’s massive military aid handouts from the US be without the combined loathing of its neighbours to call on?

  26. Ba’al Zevul, 1:07 pm, I think clarification of the meaning of “we” is needed, as in “we‘ve lost the war” and “We are now in a state of moral equivalence”.

    But yes, aggression feeds aggression. This is another example of positive feedback. Aggression promotes fear, and fear helps to propel security states towards totalitarianism, the subjects of this thread.

  27. Ba’al Zevul (La Vita è Finita)

    19 Feb, 2014 - 1:26 pm

    We: The democratic formerly Christian West. Sorry.

  28. Ba’al Zevul (La Vita è Finita)

    19 Feb, 2014 - 1:28 pm

    …which is not to minimise the increasing tendency of the EU’s central members to see Israel for what it really is, and impose sanctions…

  29. Ba’al Zevul, 1:26 pm, no apology necessary; I struggle with that term “we” myself! It creeps into my comments, and I have to rewrite them before they’re clear enough to post.

  30. “I have no idea what to do about it.”

    I recommend agitating in your community and on the streets.

    Hanging around here endlessly bickering with a handful of people for 13 pages of comments is probably not any way to challenge the powers that be.

  31. “Hanging around here endlessly bickering with a handful of people for 13 pages of comments is probably not any way to challenge the powers that be.”

    + 1

  32. If true, abandon all hope for truth and justice. They are laughing in our faces, again.

    Ambassador Prosor becomes first Israeli to chair elections to UN Human Rights Committee

    Israeli ambassador to UN unanimously nominated by representatives of 170 countries to chair significant elections, says ‘central role Israel plays to advance human rights is the real answer to anyone calling for boycotts against us’.

    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4489889,00.html

    Prosor was in Kensington Green from 2007 – 2011. I was outside his gate a few times over that period!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ron_Prosor

  33. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 2:10 pm

    “Hanging around here endlessly bickering with a handful of people for 13 pages of comments is probably not any way to challenge the powers that be.”
    _____________________

    I would certainly agree with that. And allow myself to add that posting ad nauseam on the usual themes is unlikely to influence the powers that be either; at most it is the mutual “feeding” of a small group of commenters who – to judge by their reaction to anyone who attempts to challenge – are on the same page anyway and therefore have little if any need of nourishment.

  34. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 2:13 pm

    “Israeli ambassador to UN unanimously nominated by representatives of 170 countries to chair significant elections,..”
    ______________-

    That’s interesting (especially the unanimity). What conclusions do people here draw from this?

  35. ‘Cringe’ Mary is appropriate speaking of the Saudi collective. Grovel kneel and quiver are components of fear.

    Prince Bandar lead the field in revulsion, abhorrence and despair when he implied an arranged terrorist attack could snuff the flame and spirit of the Olympic games.

    That to me is inhuman.

  36. Is the UK state not conducting a terrorist action in Syria using proxies, similar to its operation in Yugoslavia and not dissimilar to its murderous operations in Northern Ireland. So this is once again a terrorist organisation, the UK government, spreading calumny against all and sundry and in many dirty trick methods in order to obscure their own violence.

  37. Habbabkuk, please follow your own advice by reposting your 2:13 pm comment on the previous thread which is already on that topic, and requesting that any replies be directed there rather than here.

    I know it was Mary who introduced this topic here; I was trying to comment less, but a discussion really would divert this thread.

  38. People often say: “How could an intelligent, cultured race — the Germans — allow Nazism to exert such a grip on the life of the nation?”

    How? Like this — a bit at a time, while most ordinary people get on with their lives. Unless you actually come up against the state, you tend not to realise how oppressive it’s becoming until it’s too late.

  39. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 2:31 pm

    Clark

    “Habbabkuk, please follow your own advice by reposting your 2:13 pm comment on the previous thread which is already on that topic, and requesting that any replies be directed there rather than here.

    I know it was Mary who introduced this topic here;..”
    ______________

    You are right, it probably does more properly belong there. Having said that, I shan’t repeat it there because that thread has, I fear, already reached the end of its useful life. Happy to stay on-topic provided that others do.

  40. Reminder: the topic of this thread is

    The Security State Crushes Ever Tighter

    The previous thread is still open and can be used for off-topic comments.

    Habbabkuk, sorry I singled you out; further off-topic comments arrived while I was writing to you.

  41. I can think of one good use this can be put to: satire.

    As an idea, there was a brilliant Goodness Gracious Me character, whose answer to anyone or anything great in the world was that the person/thing was Indian or made in India. I can easily picture a buffoonish state apparatchik whose answer to any question is “terrorism”. It is the catch-all justification for everything these people want to do, and it needs to be ridiculed.

    And yes, while the state’s abuses needs be fought and exposed, it is also important to mock them. Because the very last thing the abusers deserve is respect.

  42. Careful how you “challenge the powers that be” …

    Elderly nun among anti-nuke peace activists sentenced to prison

    http://rt.com/usa/nuclear-nun-sentenced-peace-activist-631/

    Imagine the msm if Vlad had done this!

  43. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 3:06 pm

    “Unless you actually come up against the state, you tend not to realise how oppressive it’s becoming until it’s too late.”
    ____________________

    The above has two sides to it though, doesn’t it? The institutions and laws of a state at the same time provide (or should provide) a framework for fostering the greatest happiness of the greatest number (eg, the personal positive development of the individual)and a framework for “oppressing” individual actions which it is judged work or are likely to work against that greatest happiness. So “oppression” is an integral and inevitable feature of any state. Much depends, furthermore, on how you would define it and the balance struck between it and the parallel “liberating” framework.

    Are compulsory schooling, compulsory vaccinations, compulsory motor vehicle insurance, anti-discrimination and anti-hate laws, even taxation – the list is endless – oppressive? In one sense yes, but no one would seriously argue against them, I think.

    Furthermore, it seems to me that a good deal of the arguments goes back to the use of certain technologies. Take speed cameras, for instance: if you accept the need for speed limits, and believe that they should be effective rather than just pious wishes, then you surely have to accept the use of such cameras rather than seeing their use as some sinister manifestation of a looming totalitarian state. Idem CCTV, idem vehicle number plate recognition technology, idem a certain policing of the internet, etc, etc.

    As for the point that one only becomes aware of state “oppression” when you come against it yourself, well, that’s obviously true but it is so evident that it hardly needs saying. It is irrelevant as an argument in evaluating the extent to which a state might overstep its normal and justified oppressive aspect and even more irrelevant in determining whether or not a state is sliding into totalitarianism.

  44. Ba’al Zevul (La Vita è Finita)

    19 Feb, 2014 - 3:10 pm

    Good point, Ed. Ridicule, intelligently deployed, is probably a better weapon than terror, IMO, although rebellion by the upcoming generation has a way of upsetting a norm so established. What’s regrettable is that we have nothing of the calibre of Spitting Image or early Bremner to get the mockery seen. It’s all very comfortable, and tjhe rising generation of comedians aren’t nearly sharp enough. Exceptions: Martin Rowson, the Guardian cartoonist, an unashamed fan of Hogarth and Gilray. Who were extremely rude people…

  45. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 3:12 pm

    Pykrete

    “Imagine the msm if Vlad had done this!”
    _________________

    We don’t have to imagine it, Pykrete, as we have a concrete example to throw light on your imaginings.

    I read very recently that a Russian opposition figure who also happens to be an environmental campaigner but not a nun or monk either – has just been convicted of various offences arising out of him breaching a perimeter fence somewhere – I think it was at Sochi, actually. Some damage to the fence (obviously) but no damage to anything or anybody else. He got 8 years.

  46. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 3:14 pm

    “Habbabkuk, sorry I singled you out; further off-topic comments arrived while I was writing to you.”
    _______________

    No apology necessary, Clark. Peace!

  47. yes, I have noticed as its gone beyond what can be hidden.

    “Hanging around here endlessly bickering with a handful of people for 13 pages of comments is probably not any way to challenge the powers that be.”

    Thanks Phill you can be so down to earth, I just hope that the next time rage governs our actions and we are up for taking our much challenged bodies to another kettling, that we will stop and think locally, not all bunch together in London to suit the Met’s logistics.

    BTW. Anybody seen Dietrich Wagner, the OAP who had his eyes nearly blown out of his sockets by a water canon, I wish him well and hope his mission had the desired effect.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/the-dangers-of-water-cannon-blinded-german-man-tells-britain-dont-make-the-same-mistakes-as-other-countries-9134670.html

    Such treatment will happen here, its almost inevitable as the police will have no time to distinguish between agitators, out to damage and loot, and principled activists wanting to make a democratic point.

    GCHQ and the NSA have a lot to answer for and they are refusing to do so, hence the German move to turn the table on them. Those who are challenged at airports need bringing together as a group, their arguments would make for a powerful manifestation.

  48. Habba is realistic applying simple sensible thought to the extensive subject of social issues that concern us all I hope.

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utilitarianism

    Education and reasonable indoctrination should be realised and morals and values promoted.
    We have a msm that promotes anything that seems entertaining in a desperate attempt at avoiding boredom.

    Lawful state and citizens= boring. Great…..

  49. Ba’al Zevul (La Vita è Finita)

    19 Feb, 2014 - 3:36 pm

    ‘As for the point that one only becomes aware of state “oppression” when you come against it yourself, well, that’s obviously true but it is so evident that it hardly needs saying. It is irrelevant as an argument in evaluating the extent to which a state might overstep its normal and justified oppressive aspect and even more irrelevant in determining whether or not a state is sliding into totalitarianism.’

    Not at all. When the oppression extends to people going about their formerly completely legitimate daily business, it’s extremely relevant. Totalitarianism, if it means anything, means the absence of democratic input into the laws and workings of the State. In terms of whose voices are actually heard by this or any feasibly electable government, totalitarianism has arrived. Only it’s a bit difficult for the financial markets to collectively address a Nuremberg rally. That stuff comes just a little later, when the entrenched power changes hands.

  50. Glenn Greenwald tweets:

    “The Guardian with some interesting reaction to the UK decision equating journalism and terrorism”

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/19/high-court-ruling-on-david-miranda-heathrow-detention-live-coverage

  51. ” … Russian opposition figure … got 8 years” …

    Actually he got 3 years and as he was already serving a 3-year suspended sentence he violated the conditions of his parole.

  52. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 3:49 pm

    re the subject of this thread:

    I must say that it is going somewhat overboard to take the Miranda case to come to the conclusion that certain states – presumably including the UK – are “sliding into totalitarianism”.

    Let us note firstly that although there are differences of opinion as to whether the powers contained in Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 1970 are excessive, no case has yet been made – convincingly or otherwise – that those powers are totalitarian.

    Secondly, let us note that totalitarian UK allows the legality of actions undertaken by immigration officers to be challenged in the courts.

    Thirdly, let it be noted that the three High Court judges found that those powers were used lawfully and proportionately.

    And finally, let us note that the law provides for the possibility of appeal against that High Court decision – a possibility of which Mr Miranda apparently intends to avail himself.

    Now, are these the hallmarks of a state sliding towards totalitarianism?

  53. And the security state is crushing its weakest people first, by any means possible. Please comment on this local, slightly off topic story, if you feel like it.
    http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/politics/two_years_on_and_norwich_s_disability_assessment_centre_still_does_not_have_wheelchair_access_1_3341999

  54. Mr H, I guess the desire to keep us all safe unfortunately means the end of certain freedoms and personal privacy. Leviathan can always decide what is in our best interests, even if that includes minority groups who threaten the health of the nation. Sounds suspiciously like Nazi ideology to me. Seems we’ve learned a lot from the herrenvolk — and I don’t just mean the American space programme !

  55. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 3:55 pm

    Pyrete

    Well, I read 8 years. Perhaps it was a typo. But even if you are correct, it would seem to show that Russia and the US treat such actions with equal severity. But it is interesting – given that human rights are supposed to be universal (this is often claimed by various frequent posters here) – that someone – presumably a Brit – saw fit to post on the American case but no one seemed to be similarly exercised about the Russian one.

  56. “agitating in your community and on the streets” is not the same as organised public protest.

  57. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 4:03 pm

    Mike

    “Mr H, I guess the desire to keep us all safe unfortunately means the end of certain freedoms and personal privacy. Leviathan can always decide what is in our best interests, even if that includes minority groups who threaten the health of the nation. Sounds suspiciously like Nazi ideology to me”
    ______________________

    That’s not really a very serious or substantial response, is it?

    Now I hope we’re going to try and discuss various aspects of the British state – as reflected in the structures and laws of the British state – on their own merits instead of immediately making comparisons with the Nazi, Soviet or other epochs. But I must respond to your reference to minority groups: if this is intended to be a reference to UK groups such as those responsible for the London bombings and various other bomb plots (if it is not, you will correct me), then I would point out that as far as I’m aware there were no minority groups of Jews planting bombs in Germany in the 1930s.

  58. Antoine Héry of campaign group Reporters Without Borders said his group was appalled by the ruling.

    “Once again, press freedom in the UK suffers from a confusion between journalism and terrorism by the authorities.
    It is a practice very well known and used in countries where authoritarian regimes are in power. It is a shame to say, but the United Kingdom has several times descended to that level in the past six months.
    The UK dropped 3 places in the 2014 edition of the World Press Freedom Index, and if nothing happens to protect the Guardian and its collaborators in the future, we are afraid that press freedom will be more and more seriously challenged in the country.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/19/high-court-ruling-on-david-miranda-heathrow-detention-live-coverage

    Vincent Peyrègne of the World Association of Newspaper and News Publishers has said today’s ruling deals a “serious blow” to public interest journalism in the UK:

    “With this ruling we’re even less likely to see the vital public debate – that has so far been lacking in the UK – into the nature of the Guardian’s revelations and what they mean for our society.
    The future of serious public interest journalism in the UK has been dealt a serious blow by the court’s refusal to recognise that journalists also have a vital role in defending democracy.”

    Michelle Stanistreet of the National Union of Journalists said Miranda was stopped as part of a “fishing expedition which had nothing to do with the prevention of terrorism”. She added:

    “It is clear from the evidence presented to the court of appeal that even the Metropolitan police had doubts about the propriety of stopping and searching Miranda.
    Today’s judgment represents a serious attack on press freedom and the protection of journalists’ sources. That can only limit the public’s right to know what is done in its name, and is a real threat to democracy.
    We believe there must be an urgent public inquiry into the use of anti-terrorism legislation as a battering ram against press freedom.”

    Mr Nick Pickles of campaign group Big Brother Watch said:

    “What is bizarre is that the security services twice declined to tell the police David Miranda was involved in terrorism, and then changed their mind after being told by the police that they could not use schedule 7 if he was not. This looks like making the facts up to fit the law, rather than using the appropriate power to do what was the ultimately goal, namely seizing the material in David Miranda’s possession.
    This is exactly why independent judicial oversight of terrorism powers is needed and parliament should revisit the legal framework. It is clearly remarkable for a British court to equate journalism with an act of terrorism and if the law is so vague as for that to be reasonable then it should be abundantly clear how badly in need of reform the law is.”

    (all from the same link, above)

  59. Homeland Security seeking to develop massive license plate database

    February 19, 2014

    The US Department of Homeland Security is hoping to find a private company that is technologically capable of providing a system that will track license plates across the nation, according to a new report.

    A government proposal noticed by various media outlets including The Washington Post on Tuesday shows that DHS is trying to gain the ability to sift through large amounts of data collected from roadside surveillance cameras and law enforcement license plate readers.

    The justification given on the document in question is that the database will be able to identify and track immigrants who entered the United States illegally and are on the run from authorities. The method could easily create such a vast network of information, though, that American citizens suspected of no wrongdoing could easily be snagged in the dragnet and unknowingly have their information shared between police agencies.

    A spokeswoman for the Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE), which falls under DHS authority, said the information would only be used in a way that it would not put civil liberties at risk.

    /..
    http://rt.com/usa/license-plate-database-tracking-immigrants-643/

    My reaction to the sentence in bold… Oh yeah?

    Coming to the UK soon. Have you noticed the cameras that exist already? We have ANPR and extensive CCTV surveillance.

    Surveillance cameras in Birmingham track Muslims’ every move
    About 150 car numberplate recognition cameras installed in two Muslim areas, paid for by government anti-terrorism fund
    http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2010/jun/04/surveillance-cameras-birmingham-muslims

  60. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 5:35 pm

    Komodo (15h36)

    I disagree with everything you write at 15h36 but shall only commennt on the follow excerpt:

    “Totalitarianism, if it means anything, means the absence of democratic input into the laws and workings of the State. In terms of whose voices are actually heard by this or any feasibly electable government, totalitarianism has arrived.”

    1/. I’d dispute that there is no democratic imput into the laws and workings of the state. Let me leave aside the rôle of Parliament and local authorities and ask me how you would characterize, for example, judicial reviews?

    2/. You seem to be saying that Parliamentary democracy is a sham. Now, most of the world’s nations have some sort of parliamentary system. Is it your contention that totalitarianism has arrived for most of the world (in addition of course to those states that follow non-parliamentary forms of government and are therefore, a fortiori, totalitarian)?

  61. Craig posed a straightforward yet powerful question. Have you [noticed]?

    I myself believe that examination is key to creating a perception that those who believe in true democracy are classed in this ‘as ‘terrorists’ or revolutionary at the relucent boundary.

    The judicial oath it seems means nothing to those that serve the tyranny of control and fear.

    “”I will do right by all manner of people, after the law and usages of this realm, without fear or favour, affection or ill will.” -is of no effect.

    When I say ‘we’ I mean individually, personally for the commonpoor; for freedom and justice. Those ‘we’ here in Craig’s place, understanding, reviewing, reflecting and giving respect are mind to our liberation, power to our escape from disdain.

    ‘We’ love you all.

  62. The BBC can remove news from Youtube if they don’t like it.
    http://wingsoverscotland.com/the-news-is-not-news/

  63. Here is the BBC version of the case.

    David Miranda loses detention legal battle
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-26256544

    This is one of Judge Ouseley’s previous rulings. He is also one of the three judges in the David Miranda case.

    23 August 2006,
    Bomb damage in Lebanon
    Israel launched air strikes in southern Lebanon

    The government did not knowingly assist “acts of terrorism” by allowing US aircraft carrying bombs to Israel to stop at UK airports, a judge has ruled.

    The Islamic Human Rights Commission (IHRC) claimed in the High Court the flights encouraged Israel’s campaign against Hezbollah in southern Lebanon.

    Peter Carter QC, for the IHRC, told the judge that the UK was assisting in “disproportionate military attacks”.

    The IHRC’s attempt to get an injunction halting such stopovers was rejected.

    /..
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/5277684.stm

    http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2006/08/348977.html?c=on refers

  64. Yes, sadly I have noticed, Mr. Murray and I’m sad and depressed.

    The majority probably aren’t. It may be an unpopular sentiment, but provided the Christmas sales aren’t too bad, I really don’t think that they’re bothered.

  65. “This is one of Judge Ouseley’s previous rulings. He is also one of the three judges in the David Miranda case.
    23 August 2006,
    Bomb damage in Lebanon
    Israel launched air strikes in southern Lebanon”

    Mary, would you do us all a favour and wait until at least ~page 5 of comments before you drag Israel into this thread?? PLEASE!!

  66. Yes, I have noticed Craig. We are victims of our own stupidity. I don’t think a lot of people even really know what Ed Snowden was talking about when he talked about being complicit in building an architecture of oppression and ‘turnkey’ tyranny. The internet is incredibly powerful and those people like Assange and Snowden who are gifted in this new era are trying to warn us of it’s inherent dangers if new protocols are not brought into being to safeguard us. In ‘Cypherpunks’ it was likened to the emergence of the nuclear era. At the moment we seem hellbent on persecuting the messengers and hastening on our own imprisonment. I am glad that the students of Glasgow University have elected Ed Snowden as their rector. Maybe some of the young, at least, get it, and that is hopeful.

  67. “Craig posed a straightforward yet powerful question. Have you [noticed]?”

    Certainly here in Scotland.

    The unification of the police forces, attempts to abolish corroboration, plans to make every child have a named government guardian.

    All seems to be heading in one direction.

  68. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 7:20 pm

    “The judicial oath it seems means nothing to those that serve the tyranny of control and fear.”
    __________________________

    Is not the indignation and outrage voiced in certain quarters about the High Court ruling just an example of “bad losers”? After all, it is not uncommon for UK courts to issue rulings which go against what the govt wanted – and in such cases, where those rulings are in line with the pensée unique of this blog, there are no expressions of outrage and indignation here.

    Like in football, the referee’s decision is surely final – with the difference that Mr Miranda can appeal to at least two higher courts in the UK and then, if he chooses, to the ECHR

  69. Jesselyn could have added, when describing Manning as a political prisoner, “… just as I am currently – on a temporary basis hopefully – your political prisoner.”

  70. @JimmyGiro “Pejorative or not, it is what they do.

    Err… not all the time dude! Sometimes they just hold hands, you know? Or maybe watch a film, do the dishes, mend the car…

  71. One wonders what Julian Assange, Andy Mueller Maguhn and others like them make of the latest measures mooted by the German Government. It has just seriously broken up with a certain ME country one should only mention on page five.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/germany-considers-counterespionage-measures-against-united-states-a-953985.html

    They have tried asking the USA about the extend of spying and have been batted back, now they are proposing to get proactive. I’m sure that those in the know above, Ed Snmowden, who is very popular in Germany, even within certain sectors of the rightwing CSU, the idea of an EU internet, personal encryption and much more has a far better prospect to work for all, then without their input.

  72. Habbabkuk (19 Feb, 2014 – 3:06 pm) wrote:

    “As for the point that one only becomes aware of state “oppression” when you come against it yourself, well, that’s obviously true but it is so evident that it hardly needs saying. It is irrelevant as an argument in evaluating the extent to which a state might overstep its normal and justified oppressive aspect and even more irrelevant in determining whether or not a state is sliding into totalitarianism.”

    Interesting points all round in that post, but the point about running up against the state is worth further mention. People will go out of their way to ensure they do not run up against the state. You might not be saying or doing anything wrong in the workplace, but your behaviour will be quite different if your boss happens to be looking over your shoulder. Knowing how statements can be deliberately misconstrued, one will speak with caution at all times, given that mobiles can be used as a personal bugging device.

    Surveillance has a chilling effect on the criticism of authority – even for perfectly legitimate concerns.

    We might have just a little bit of faith in the use of CCTV as being for the benefit of the public, as opposed to being for the sole use of the state against the public, if those CCTV’s occasionally happened to catch the authorities doing something wrong.

    Remember poor Ian Tomlinson – there was no case to answer, until some passing tourist’s footage of the incident happened to land in the public domain. All those high-tech cameras, plus their staff, at taxpayer expense, didn’t see a thing. We never see police identified and prosecuted for assault during demonstrations without (a) blatant offence against the innocent, and (b) independent evidence identifying the criminal concerned.

    Indeed, the authorities have gone a long way to ensuring that the public does not have the means to get evidence, by banning cameras in public demonstrations, pictures of police, and even of well known public buildings and spaces.

    How come this “nothing to hide, nothing to fear” argument only ever goes one way, when the authorities want to hide everything?

  73. A reminder what Craig said

    ‘The disgraceful judges of Britain’s High Court – who have gone along with torture, extraordinary rendition, every single argument for mass surveillance and hiding information from the public, and even secret courts – have ruled that it was lawful for the Home Office …..’

    Planes landing on British soil carrying bombs for Israel to use on Lebanon come into the equation in my opinion.

    Think too of the jets taking tortured souls for rendition which were also allowed to use our airports and airspace.

  74. Damn right i’ve noticed.

    Many people have noticed.

  75. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 8:33 pm

    Glenn-uk

    You too have made some interesting points. But it’s difficult for anyone to discuss dispassionately and cast aside certain basic philosophies, isn’t it.

    Let’s take what you said about the use of CCTV. No reasonable person could argue against your contention that CCTV should serve to identify wrong-doing by anyone and that that includes wrong-doing on the part of the authorities, whether police or other. But you “spoil” (if I can use that word) your argument somewhat by saying “…as opposed to being for the sole use of the state against the public,..” : that expression is tendentious because it tends to transform the use of CCTV by the police against law breakers into an affair of the “state” against the “public”;; the police are not the state, except insofar as they maintain (or should maintain) the law of the state, and the law breakers are not the public except insofar as they are part of the public.

    On a point of information, is it really the case that cameras are banned on public demonstrations and that one cannot take pictures of police officers (not clear whether you meant on such demonstrations or more widely) or certain public buildings? I can well imagine that some police officers on the spot would claim that taking pictures is illegal, but is this really so or is it just a case of them pushing their luck (in the same way as other public officials do when they think they can get away with it? I’d welcome more on this theme if you or some one else would care to supply more detail.

  76. Resident Dissident

    19 Feb, 2014 - 8:41 pm

    Pykrete

    “Imagine the msm if Vlad had done this!”

    Well he certainly has a rather tougher policy with regard to questioning those he doesn’t like when they leave Russia – I myself have been questioned many times about my activities when leaving Russia, and the detail and the extent of the questioning is far more detailed and extensive than that experienced by Jesselyn Radack (unjustified though such behaviour clearly is I might add). If I had links with someone who was responsible for liberating KGB secrets I’m pretty sure that I wouldn’t be here now. I should also add that for good measure the Boarder Guards (or should we call them the KGB to be be more accurate) also spent so long interviewing my son, who was at a time still not an adult that he missed the flight and then we had to spend further time in Russia renewing the paper work (funny how they find such deficiencies when they want) so that he could not leave until a number of days later.

    Oh and for those who think this is an isolated incident – perhaps they should ask why BA always builds about 1 hour into its schedule for flight delays leaving Moscow. I might also add that the British Embassy in Moscow has been worse than useless in improving matters over many many years.

    Perhaps I should ask Wikileaks and the Sam Adams Trust to represent my case with the Russian authorities – but on second thoughts I don’t think I will bother.

  77. Resident Dissident

    19 Feb, 2014 - 9:07 pm

    Habba

    I think this is the case you were referring to

    http://navalny-en.livejournal.com/117916.html

    Perhaps Snowden could take it up with his lawyer, who is also on the KGB supervisory board and is a friend of Putins, or Craig could raise it next time he is on Voice of Russia, or Assange in one of his independent programmes on Russia today? Or perhaps everyone here could write a letter to the Russian Ambassador.

    PS don’t mention the Ice Hockey

  78. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 9:20 pm

    Resident Dissident

    Thank you and yes that’s the case I was thinking of (sorry for getting the Sochi detail wrong). I note the 3 year sentence, so the 8 years I saw was a typo.

  79. @H, RD …

    My comment was not meant to excuse or condone Russian behaviour towards any particular individuals. It was merely to highlight the treatments by western media of similar behaviours by the “good guys” as compared to the current/future “bad guys”.

    Never been through Moscow. Had fun with TSA at Dallas with a laptop and photo gear (sister-in-law lives 15miles from Dubya!!)

  80. This blog is always worth a read. It gives chapter and verse in close detail on security and surveillance developments.

    http://spyblog.org.uk/

  81. It’s good to see so much agreement that the “us and them” is not Britain vs Russia, it’s the people vs the psychopath in both. Different sections of the blog are gathering evidence against those with a thirst for power both sides of the Atlantic and in Eastern Europe as well.

  82. Habbabkuk (20:33): Agreed, it is certainly difficult to discuss on an entirely objective basis. Even the selection of indisputable facts betrays a bias, let alone the direction in which they steer the discussion.

    For instance, your argument about whether we should be be talking about CCTV being used against “the pubic”, or “lawbreakers”. I’d argue it’s definitely used against a group, and for the police (or state), rather than for the public generally. If it were only used as evidence to prosecute law-breakers, we would not have many concerns. However, when the police are also law-breakers, CCTV is of no use to the public.

    Obviously CCTV will be used when the police are (figuratively) throwing one of their own under the bus, but that will only be when they are bang to rights anyway. As far as protecting the law, rather than the state – and those with interests that benefit from the power of state apparatus – take a look at this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gxI4ToNKGQ

    Here you have police acting against lawful protestors, as the muscle for a private corporation. They’re not just clearing people obstructing the highway, and certainly not looking after the interests of locals. They forbid evidence being captured, and then blatantly lie to bring false charges against a protestor.

    Such behaviour should be regarded as grounds for immediate dismissal and prosecution, but of course nothing of the kind will happen. All his colleagues who witnessed the “fit-up” and did nothing should also be up for the same. Perverting the law – like surveillance – is a one-way street.

    *

    As I understand it, section 76 of the “Counter Terrorism Act” (2008) allows for arresting those “eliciting, publishing or communicating information about members of armed forces etc” – it specifically goes on to mention police – “which is of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.

    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2008/28/section/76

    This is wide open to interpretation.

    In China, just about everything is a crime. Failing to notify authorities and get written permission (which is never forthcoming) when moving between areas is a crime. Nobody is ever prosecuted for it, unless they fall foul of the authorities for some reason. Thereupon, you have committed an arrestable offence.

    Same trick, different regime – here we have a near catch-all which can be employed whenever someone does something the state, and its enforcers, does not like. It might be dismissed as individual police “pushing their luck”, you may not get prosecuted eventually, but it’s pretty effective in hauling someone off, destroying their evidence, and only admitting they might have gone a bit far after the fact.

    If any police officer has been disciplined for harassing law-abiding citizens for ludicrous “terrorist” related charges, I have not heard of it.

  83. ‘strewth – when I make a typo, does it have to be _such_ a howler? Wish there were some sort of edit feature. :(

    Any kindly mods still about, I’d be most obliged…

  84. any fule can see

    19 Feb, 2014 - 10:13 pm

    As various states slide towards totalitarianism, a defining factor is that their populations really don’t notice. Well, I have noticed. Have you?

    An answer may come in how people respond to RB’s comments about TB advising on holding a Hutton type enquiry. Gob smacking if it is proved he said it and if people still do not find that their confidence in the system is shaken well then presumably you have to conclude that they deserve the system they get.

  85. any fule can sleep

    19 Feb, 2014 - 10:24 pm

    The wonderful possibly greatest ever GP driver Tazio Nuvolari, who is said to have invented the technnique of drifitng a Masarati 250 around a corner, when asked whether he was scared of dying in a motor race answered with a question, noting that most people die in bed, but are you terrified of going to sleep? And as we know the answer is no.

  86. Resident Dissident

    19 Feb, 2014 - 10:35 pm

    Pykrete

    I once was stopped at Atlanta where the border guard went through all the pile of printed material I held (about 4-5 inches) – when he flicked through a book of Jan Morris travel essays I had and when he alighted on one chapter he just questioned “Moscow?” in a low and deep voice. I’m afraid that border guards around the world are pretty much cut from the same cloth.

  87. half the fules can wake up

    19 Feb, 2014 - 10:47 pm

    “WHITEWASH”

    The reference to the Hutton inquiry could prove hugely embarrassing for the former Labour leader, who won three elections to lead Britain from 1997 to 2007 but who has had to repeatedly defend himself over his decision to join the United States in going to war in Iraq.

    Lord Hutton was appointed by Blair to investigate the circumstances which led to the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) reporting that the government had “sexed up” the case for the invasion of Iraq.

    That near six-month investigation cleared the government of any wrongdoing and laid the blame firmly at the door of the BBC, leading to the resignation of two of its most senior executives. A poll of Britons in the wake of the inquiry found that half believed the report was a “whitewash”.

    Cut & pasted from Reuters article today: Former PM Blair offered to help Murdoch over phone-hacking
    BY MICHAEL HOLDEN AND KATE HOLTON
    LONDON Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:55pm

  88. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 11:05 pm

    I must agree that bLiar slipped up when he suggested a Hutton type enquiry; one would have thought that the old twister would have found a safer example :)

    I wonder why the prosecution brought this up. And it will be interesting to see what consequences might flow.

    (Oops – O/T – harmless – but apologies anyway!)

  89. Habbabkuk, 8:33 pm; photography has effectively been criminalised under section 44 of the Terrorism Act – at the discretion of the police. Some useful links and resources:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/warning-do-not-take-this-picture-1833127.html

    http://photographyisnotacrime.com/forums/topic/uk-traffic-officer-harassing-photographer/

    http://www.photographyisntacrime.com/

    There have been several incidents of police confiscating cameras and memory cards at demonstrations, erasing the data before returning them. On one occasion, I seem to remember, data recovery techniques were used by the photographer to recover evidence against the police.

  90. Mary, 6.45pm

    This is one of Judge Ouseley’s previous rulings. He is also one of the three judges in the David Miranda case.

    So was Assange’s extradition (High Court). A political, rather than legal, decision if ever there was one. Same with Miranda.

  91. “Drone victims are today lodging a complaint with the International Criminal Court (ICC) accusing NATO member states of war crimes over their role in facilitating the US’ covert drone programme in Pakistan.”

    http://www.reprieve.org.uk/press/2014_02_19_complaint_international_court_drones/

  92. Hi Craig,

    Nice to hear Julian Assange is bearing up in the Ecuadorian embassy. Must have been a very interesting chat, all youse Sam Adams types around the same table.

    Meanwhile, the debate in Sweden over whether the Swedish prosecutor should be sacked for refusing to interrogate Assange in London is hotting up:

    Nordic News Network 3/1/14: Mounting Criticism of Swedish Prosecution in Assange case:
    http://www.nnn.se/nordic/assange/critics.pdf

    Sverige Radio 4/1/14: Most of Eric Holder’s visit has been kept secret:
    “Our political reporter Ci Holmgren had to ask the Swedish Minister of Justice what Holder really doing here.”:
    https://sverigesradio.se/sida/artikel.aspx?programid=1637&artikel=5775707

    Expressen 4/1/14: Holder’s speech is not likely to have calmed Assange:
    http://www.expressen.se/kronikorer/mats-larsson/holders-tal-lar-inte-ha-lugnat-assange/

    SvD 11/2/14: Assange should be treated according to Swedish law:
    http://www.svd.se/opinion/brannpunkt/assange-should-be-treated-according-to-swedish-law_8982528.svd

    Paragraf 13/2/14: Not so little fishy [Google translated]:
    http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.magasinetparagraf.se%2Fbilden%2Finte-sa-lite-skumt

    Dagens Juridik 18/2/14: The prosecution has painted itself into a corner with no honorable return:
    http://www.dagensjuridik.se/2014/02/assange-sarbehandlas-negativt

    Last one translated: http://rixstep.com/1/20140219,00.shtml

  93. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 11:28 pm

    Thanks, Glenn-uk

    Not nit-picking but just a couple of (genuine) queries about your latest.

    “I’d argue it’s definitely used against a group,..”

    By “group”, are you speaking generically, ie do you mean a segment of the public or are you referring to specific groups, eg muggers, or demonstrators?

    “If it were only used as evidence to prosecute law-breakers, we would not have many concerns.”

    You appear to be suggesting it is also used for other purposes. What do you have in mind?

    Re. your China example : that was interesting and certainly gives the state a strong hold over everyone, or almost. But the example depends on the existence of the “notify when moving between areas” law and, presumbaly, other laws of that type. Now, for your example to be transposable to the UK, you would have to find examples of similar laws – or laws with similar intent – in the UK. Do you have any?…..

    …..unless you mean the panonply of UK anti-terrorism laws…? (it’s not clear to me from your text).

    On the photo-ing question : I’d find it difficult to believe that the section you refer to is used to justify an order not to take photos at a demonstration. Now, I agree that you could be arrested and then not charged, but can you refer to any cases of this kind where charges were brought and the matter came to court?

    And, finally, thank you for the courteous way in which you set out your thoughts.

  94. “So when “a foreign exchange trader” jumped to his death from the top of JP Morgan’s Hong Kong headquarters this morning, that definitely raised my eyebrows.”

    http://www.wallstreetsectorselector.com/2014/02/trail-dead-bankers-lead-somewhere/

  95. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 11:35 pm

    Arbed

    You’re straying perilously near off-topic as well….

  96. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!

    19 Feb, 2014 - 11:37 pm

    Clark

    thanks for that on photos, I hadn’t seen it when I replied to Glenn-uk.

  97. “Perhaps Snowden could take it up with his lawyer, who is also on the KGB supervisory board and is a friend of Putins, or Craig could raise it next time he is on Voice of Russia, or Assange in one of his independent programmes on Russia today? Or perhaps everyone here could write a letter to the Russian Ambassador.”

    Contrariwise, the effort to place Snowden and Vitishko at opposite poles is a conservative gambit without any realistic odds of winning.

    Have you considered that their goals could be in unison? I doubt it.

  98. “You’re straying perilously near off-topic as well….”

    Pot/Kettle

  99. Habbabkuk, 11.35pm

    Excuse me? Let me quote from Craig’s post:

    I had dinner inside the Ecuadorian Embassy on Sunday with Julian Assange, who I am happy to say is as fit and well as possible in circumstances of confinement. Amongst those present was Jesselyn Radack, attorney for, among others, Edward Snowden. Last week on entering the UK she was pulled over by immigration and interrogated about her clients…

    Presumably you’re aware that the dinner at the Ecuadorian embassy was for the Sam Adams group (it’s been all over the news…); that the Sam Adams group were meeting at the embassy ahead of the award of this year’s Sam Adams Prize to Chelsea Manning at the Oxford Union this very evening, with Craig one of the speakers there (I do hope you’ll post the video when it’s available, Craig); that Jesselyn Radack was questioned at Heathrow Border Control – though not quite as fiercely as David Miranda (also very topical this evening) – about her intended destination (guess where? Yes, that’s right, the Ecuadorian embassy to meet up with Assange and Craig); and that Julian Assange is a previous winner of said prize.

    Quite rare for me to be this on-topic, actually. 😉

  100. “GP magazine Pulse reported on 7/2/14, “Patients who have opted out of the scheme will still have their records sent to the HSCIC stripped of identifiers” (see 4th paragraph from bottom of this article). This confirms something buried on page 9 of NHS England’s recently-published care.data Privacy Impact Assessment [PDF] (UPDATE 12/2/14: there appeares to be a problem with the official link to the PIA, so here is a copy), which states:”

    http://medconfidential.org/how-to-opt-out/

1 2 3 5

Powered By Wordpress | Designed By Ridgey | Produced by Tim Ireland | Hosted In The Cloud