Yes Scotland Meeting Edinburgh 115


Am back in Edinburgh and speaking at a Yes Scotland meeting on Friday 24 May at the Columcille Centre, 2 Newbattle Terrace, Edinburgh at 7pm.

This is my first entry as a speaker into the referendum campaign, and I am excited – and nervous – about it. I have of course given quite literally hundreds of speeches, on every continent, in the last nine years. I have spoken before official committees of the Council of Europe, European Parliament, Arab League, UK Parliament and Scottish Parliament. I have spoken at a great many of the world’s most prestigious universities. I have spoken to crowds in the tens of thousands.

That has been almost all on the subject of universal human rights, international legality and peace, about which I am so passionate I abandoned a well-paid career to serve those causes. At the Columcille Centre on Friday my audience will not be remotely the largest, or most intimidating, or most potentially hostile, I have ever faced. But I will be speaking in the cause of the freedom of my own nation. That brings a lump to my throat and butterflies to my stomach. And so it damn well ought.


115 thoughts on “Yes Scotland Meeting Edinburgh

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  • Mark Golding - Children of Conflict

    Humans are in a perpetual ‘muddle’ Guano. The requisite for our life required a colossus universe to transmute spirit to matter. It was matter that eventually delivered frozen water to a random place that would sustain it and prepare that place for a precursor life form, delivered by that same matter.

    It seems humans have confused Spirit and matter since we recognised meteorites came from the cosmos. The hard granite like substance was thought to connect us with the stars and their gods. Early humans revered this rock; ultimately it had arrived on earth from the heavens in a massive fireball. It was an idol and the seed of religion. A kaaba, a sacred place, a center of peace and hence trade, recorded by writers such as Procopius and Nonnosus, a place of pilgrimage.

    That is I believe the essence and right now it can easily be destroyed by the very same forces that created the warmth that maintains us.

  • Jemand

    Technicolour, what is your problem in understanding that despotic regimes came to power using violence, like the Catholic Church used violence and how Islamists use violence?

    I didn’t know that balaclava hooded people were roaming the streets until I read it here on this blog. I haven’t seen anything in the media so far. What is my reaction? I predicted it, exept for the fact that I learnt about the news later than the rest of you. And I predict more violence. Is that good enough of a reaction for you or should I pour my heart out and cry? Like that does any good. It can sure make you feel like you’re a better person than others tho’.

    Happy with targetting of the vast majority of peaceful people? What the fuck are you accusing me of now? Did I advocate violence against Muslims? No. I predicted it. It’s not hard to predict escalating tit-for-tattery. You just imagined my endorsement of violence Technicolour, just like all the other crap you imagine that gives you cause to assume a morally superior pose.

    All those percentages you quoted might be correct, but as usual, you don’t understand that they are not relevant in this discussion. I have been saying for a long time, including on this blog, that “terrorist” related violence in the West is way less than car accidents. That hysteria over terrorism is unjustified and people ought to get a grip. So please don’t lecture me on comparative violence between Islamists, nationalists, lunatics et al. You’re arguing about something altogether different. Not even on the same page.

    And you are clearly disinterested in factual numbers yourself. Demographic statistics speak of another development and you either know about it, understand it and care – or you do not. Clearly you do not. A long time ago, Britain was full of pagans, then Roman Catholics, then Protestants and, coming soon – Muslims. All earlier transformations were violent – that’s a fact, unless you feel like contradicting me. Ya just can’t get your head around that, can ya? It’s just .. all too silly to contemplate. Isn’t it? 

    Violence filled the world for time immemorial, and much of the world still today. Blaming individuals and denying the reality of franchised political violence is not a solution – it’s part of the problem. So please cut the bullshit excuses, apologies, rainbows and hugs that serve only to demonstrate what a wonderful person you are.

  • technicolour

    Dear Jemand; Thanks for your reply. Why are you quoting ‘despotic regimes who came to power through violence’ in the first place? With whom are you drawing a modern analogy? Of whom are you scared?

    I agree that with the leaders we have at the moment the world does not particularly feel in safe hands. I too can sit here predicting violence in this country, as opposed to violence against other countries. The difference, I think, is you, based on your view of Islam, predict an upsurge of violence – a terrifying upsurge of violence – coming from a tiny and already demonised percentage of the population, apparently. Really? Have I got this right? If not, many apologies. If so, based on where, exactly?

    Re demographics: please provide your figures as to how 4 people are able to overwhelm 100 people. If your answer is ‘by having more babies’ then could you provide the calculation which shows how ‘they’ will be able to do this; factoring in environmental, social and global factors which now and in future are affecting population growth, obviously.

    Could you also, perhaps, realise that, as a society, we need more babies?
    The assimilation of people of all shapes and sizes and skin complexions and ideas into this nation is these days a peaceful process, quite unlike the barbarity displayed by the Protestants towards the Roman Catholics. Again, I don’t see where your analogy comes from.

    Immigration itself is a controlled and gradual process. The figures are here:

    UK (ONS 2011)
    Total of what is called long-term immigration: 598,000
    Number of students included in total (who actually have short term status): 250,000
    Total UK long-immigration: 339,000

    UK Emigration: 338,000

    “Happy with targetting of the vast majority of peaceful people? What the fuck are you accusing me of now?2

    I asked a question. Was that an answer?

    “Did I advocate violence against Muslims? No. I predicted it. It’s not hard to predict escalating tit-for-tattery.”

    Two lunatics condemned by Muslims everywhere and the gangs come in – where’s the tit for tat? There’s no organised Muslim gang like the EDL,

    “You just imagined my endorsement of violence Technicolour, just like all the other crap you imagine that gives you cause to assume a morally superior pose”

    Do you think it’s ‘morally superior’ to want to stop violence? If your mother, or someone close to you, was being attacked, would it be ‘morally superior’ to try and stop that happening? I don’t understand.

    “franchised political violence” – do you mean “breaking the law”?

  • Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!)

    “Number of students included in total (who actually have short term status):”

    …..and many of whom actually stay on illegally after the end of their studies.

  • guano

    Juteman

    Thick or Trolls?

    Both, it seems, in the passive sense. We have ‘been thickened’ by our security services’ and MSM’s skill at false-flag operations into a false debate and we have ‘been trolled’ into knee-jerk reactions.

    If you don’t like the morale debate on UK foreign policy, you probably won’t like the conspiracy theory debate either. Apologies. What a waste of time and space. But at least Jemand found a new friend.

  • A Node

    Juteman 23 May, 2013 – 6:44 pm

    “Are 90% of folk on this thread thick, or simple trolling?”

    I’ve been wondering why anybody with such a low regard for the folk on this thread would continue to post on it. I can think of only two plausible answers — he/she must be thick or simply trolling.

  • technicolour

    “and many of whom actually stay on illegally after the end of their studies” – notice unspecified number based purely on speculation. Prove otherwise.

  • Cryptonym

    It is well that one of the uglier aspects of Scottish society is aired and is not ignored amongst all the soaring optimism. That is freemasonry: its influence, the terrible damage it does in so many spheres, and its potential for abuses before, during and after the referendum.

    I’ve noticed that this blog, which updates at a glacial pace
    http://www.tomminogue.com/blog7.php/second-page
    has recently had an update to its content in a series on this subject.

  • Komodo

    Somehow, they must think, Islam will inexplicably plateau at a low percentage, or transform to become a modern British equivalent of pseudo-Christianity.

    Well, there you go, then. We’ve (us Celts, Romans, Vikings, Saxons, Normans, Huguenots, Jews, Hindus, Caribbeans, etc) managed to absorb and subvert Christianity, so why not Islam?

    You’ve seen the bad side of Islam, maybe, Jemand. I’ve glimpsed the bad side of Christianity (see any fundamentalist Baptist site for details), and I can’t put a fag paper between the two bad sides as regards proselytising and the promotion of hatred.

    Personally (Guano), I have no problem with ‘la illaha il Allah’ If there’s a God, it is more rational to believe (if you allow belief to have any rational content whatever) that there is one only, and that it is universal. Which means that it probably doesn’t favour one part of the thin organic layer on this insignificant planet. It’s the “wa Mohammed rasul Allah” which bothers me for that selfsame reason. The BOOK versions of the one God are tribal ones, and all are to be deplored in my as humble as I ever get opinion.

  • Jemand

    @Technicolour

    Living in a bubble of optimism is one way you can view the world. Another way is to look at the rest of the world as it grapples with unprecedented problems of extreme climate events, collapse of local ecologies, exploitative economic systems and social unrest, and be grateful for living in the sweet spot of time and space – in comfortable 21stC England. Are you so sure that the UK is NOW resistant to dramatic change, unlike at any other time in its history?

    Perhaps you are indifferent or agreeable to the Islamisation of the UK. If that’s the case, no problem – for you. For others, it’s not OK. I won’t mention the diminished role of women in Islamic societies, that would be a sly attempt at appealing to your feminist sensibilities. We’ll leave that one out.

    I could quote from various readings but I think it is better that I give you the sources of some discussion ‘out there’ on the intergoogle for you to consider, critique, contradict. In particular, I would appreciate a creditable source link for an argument that asserts that Islamisation of the UK or West is a bogeyman or silly phobia promulgated by stupid Chicken Littles, like me.

    Christian website discusses Islamisation of West, obviously biased – 
    http://89.206.188.153/US/News/Archives/The-Islamisation-of-the-West.html?p=0

    Interesting discourse, probably racist – 
    http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/edwest/9666257/heres_an_inconvenient_truth_the_islamisation_of_europe/

    A crazy woman criticizes Islam (probably a member of Stormfront) –
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbz2ZC59_yw

  • fedup

    …. It’s the “wa Mohammed rasul Allah” which bothers me

    Yea Olde Lizard, you have been so pessimistic lately, “glass is half empty” pasted all over.

    Ever thought, that “wa Mohammed rasul Allah”, has been intented to ensure that the versus of Quran are in fact not the creative work of the said: “rasul”. Therefore no tribalism connotation based on this context; “glass is half full” sort of an outlook.

    Ergo; obtains the universality of one God/Allah.

  • fedup

    That is freemasonry: its influence, the terrible damage it does in so many spheres, and its potential for abuses before, during and after the referendum.

    Precisely, as you have astutely observed.

  • Haemoglobin

    Well I was there, the venue was full, all the speakers were interesting, and Craig was probably the best of the lot. Of course I’m biased as I read Craig’s blog, I’m in alignment with a fair amount of what he says, and I don’t know if any of the other speakers even have blogs. Craig made some strong points about British foreign policy, as was probably to be expected, and despite being the last speaker, was the first to bring up the issue of “indyref” media bias. Media bias was the main issue from audience questions afterwards, and (Craig aside) the responses from the panel of speakers didn’t fill me with confidence.

    Craig, if you’re reading this, of course I would have hung around and got you out for a drink and discussion about the world and about your Scottish family (Scottish family history being a big interest of mine, once my livelihood, now I merely moonlight) but I’m imagining you have had better offers for this evening. Some other time perhaps.

  • Vronsky

    I managed to be there too in the end (@haemoglobin: the noisy American with the ‘Yes’ button was my wife). Craig was terrific, giving a much-needed international context: ‘the United Kingdom is no longer an entity of which we can be proud’! Well said.

    All were good though, and doesn’t the air seem cleaner when there is no-one around from New Labour, Conservatives and Lib Dems?

    There’s an interesting piece here from Professor Michael Gardiner at the University of Warwick.

    “Some of us don’t like nationalism at all, which is one of the main reasons we support the Yes campaign for self-determination.”

  • Cryptonym

    After the News Quiz kerfuffle a few weeks ago, a regular guest on the show the next week was

    http://pinkindustry.wordpress.com/2008/04/02/daniel-finkelstein-2/

    If ever confirmation was needed that the BBC is utterly shameless and that politicisation of every nook and cranny of their output is total, this seals it.

    Finkelstein is every bit one of the especial and guilty warmongers and propaganda agents.

    It is beyond satire, sickening that license payers line the pockets of such bought scum.

  • Stuart Edinburgh

    I went along and was impressed with the quality of the debate. Very interested in the BBC bias comments. You had a proposal which I think should be followed up. The BBC these days I think are totally off the rails, not just on the YES campaign but a number of other issues too. They need to be accountable for their actions.

  • Komodo

    Ever thought, that “wa Mohammed rasul Allah”, has been intented to ensure that the versus of Quran are in fact not the creative work of the said: “rasul”. Therefore no tribalism connotation based on this context; “glass is half full” sort of an outlook.

    Ergo; obtains the universality of one God/Allah.

    VERY good point, Fedup. But at risk of seeming pessimistic – which is my default mode on anything involving politics, religion or football – the universality of the deity is not best demonstrated by his handing down several entirely different messages – all claimable as authentic – and I think my point stands.

    I’m still waiting for a messenger of God who signs off with the message: “I am of absolutely no importance in this matter. It is my dying wish that you do not even remember my existence, but get on with worshipping the one God alone.”

    But of course that would be terrible politics.

  • Abe Rene

    I assume you didn’t say “I prefer living on the Isle of Thanet.” 🙂

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