Disappearing Aircraft 5626


I had fairly well concluded that the most likely cause was a fire disrupting the electrical and control systems, when CNN now say the sharp left turn was pre-programmed 12 minutes before sign off from Malaysian Air Traffic control, which was followed fairly quickly by that left turn.

CNN claim to have this from an US official, from data sent back before the reporting systems went off.  It is hard to know what to make of it: obviously there are large economic interests that much prefer blame to lie with the pilots rather than the aircraft.  But if it is true then the move was not a response to an emergency.  (CNN went on to say the pilot could have programmed in the course change as a contingency in case of an emergency.  That made no sense to me at all – does it to anyone else?)

I still find it extremely unlikely that the plane landed or crashed on land  I cannot believe it could evade military detection as it flew over a highly militarized region.  Somewhere there is debris on the ocean.  There have been previous pilot suicides that took the plane with them; but the long detour first seems very strange and I do not believe is precedented.  However if the CNN information on pre-programming is correct, and given it was the co-pilot who signed off to air traffic control, it is hard to look beyond the pilots as those responsible for whatever did happen.  In fact, on consideration, the most improbable thing is that information CNN are reporting from the US official.


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5,626 thoughts on “Disappearing Aircraft

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  • michael norton

    President Volodymyr Zelensky has called on the public to abstain from speculating about what may have caused a Ukrainian airliner to crash in Iran.

    It may be just a terrible coincidence that 160 plus people have died in an American built aircraft, leaving Iran for Ukraine at the same time as Iran is striking American bases in the Middle East.

    This could become a mystery like MH17

  • michael norton

    Ukraine aircraft crashes in Iran, soon after take off.

    Ukraine’s embassy in Tehran and Iranian state television both initially said technical issues caused the crash.

    But the embassy later removed this statement and said any comment regarding the cause of the accident prior to a commission’s inquiry was not official.
    Maybe 170 dead, including a few U.K. people.

  • michael norton

    Things quite bad for Boeing
    “The release of a batch of internal messages has raised more questions about the safety of Boeing’s 737 Max.

    In one of the communications an employee said the plane was “designed by clowns”.

    The plane maker described the communications as “completely unacceptable”.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51058929
    One unnamed employee wrote in an exchange of instant messages in April 2017:
    “This airplane is designed by clowns who in turn are supervised by monkeys.”

  • michael norton

    July 2020 – new date for Max to fly, again.

    Boeing has been working on fixes to try to get the 737 Max planes back up and running.

    But the company has struggled to convince regulators that the planes are safe to fly?
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51200118
    The jet has been grounded since March after two fatal crashes, which together killed 346 people.
    Boeing shares dropped by more than 5% on Tuesday as word of the delay started to spread, prompting the New York Stock Exchange to temporarily halt trading until the company’s formal update.

  • michael norton

    Boeing’s crisis-hit 737 Max jetliner faces a new potential safety issue as debris has been found in the fuel tanks of several new planes which were in storage, awaiting delivery to airlines.

    The head of Boeing’s 737 programme has told employees that the discovery was “absolutely unacceptable”.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51499777
    You don’t say.

  • michael norton

    Now we have disappearing airlines,
    partialy because of Coronavirus, all airlines currently struggling.

    I bet Boeing are struggling, nobody in their right mind is going to buy a new fleet of airliners, untill this thing passes.

  • michael norton

    A “culture of concealment”, cost cutting and “grossly insufficient” oversight led to two fatal crashes of Boeing 737 Max aircraft that claimed 346 lives, a congressional report has concluded.

    The preliminary findings, issued by Democrats on the House transportation committee, conclude that Boeing “jeopardized the safety of the flying public” in its attempts to get the Max approved by regulators.

    In a blistering 13-page report the committee found Boeing’s Max design “was marred by technical design failures, lack of transparency with both regulators and customers”.
    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/mar/06/boeing-culture-concealment-fatal-737-max-crashes-report

    What with their terrible actions and this terrible review of their actions, the shutting down of World trade and shutting down of world travel

    things do not look rosy for Boeing.

  • michael norton

    The Donald has made a decree, that no visitors from Europe may fly to America, other than from Ireland or United Kingdom.
    This is Coronavirus.
    So, even less reason for Boeing to make aircraft.
    Nobody in the world will be buying new aircraft unless they are planes for war.

    It is quite possible that air travel will not go back to where it was, in the future as more people shame those constant air travellers behaviour, in sucking the life blood out of the worlds resources.

  • Paul Peppiatt

    I saw a movie a couple of years ago in which pilots and air crew working on board Boeing jets were getting seriously ill. I think the airline was Pan Am who if my memory serves me right used ruthless means in order to conceal a fault with exhaust fumes entering cabin area.The airline was exposed when an investigator took swabs from the cabin area , confirming the presence of highly toxic compounds.Mike Powell documentary “Something in the Air” on BBC sounds also covers this..Apologies for not remembering movie title , will post if i find it.P.

    • Chris

      Paul, it’s a real problem, not just in Boeings, and has been around for a long time. First came to prominence in BAe 146 many years ago, and problems have been reported with Boeing, Airbus and Embraer, too, as far as I can recall. Engine bleed air used for cabin ventilation can become contaminated by engine oil or hydraulic fluid leaks – both synthetics with seriously toxic ingredients.
      I’m sure I remeber reading that Boeing was introducing a novel ventilation system for the 787 that doesn’t use bleed air, so this threat should be eliminated.Boeing at the right end of aviation safety, in that case….

      • Paul+Peppiatt

        Thanks Chris, this does ring a bell something about leaking rubber seals, i think Boeing came up with a solution but airlines were slow to impliment it.

  • michael norton

    I wonder how Boeing are getting along with their iffy 737 MAX?

    Boeing Co has reported another 75 cancellations for its 737 MAX jetliner in March, as the coronavirus crisis “weakened” travel demand, hurting global airlines and worsening disruptions from the grounding of Boeing’s best-selling jet.

    Tuesday’s news follows an announcement by the United States Treasury Department that the country’s biggest passenger airlines have agreed in principle to a $25bn bailout package.
    https://www.aljazeera.com/ajimpact/boeing-suffers-cancellations-737-max-orders-200415014316384.html
    The pandemic has forced US planemaker Boeing and European rival Airbus to cut production in the face of plunging demand, cash problems at airlines and logistical difficulties in delivering aircraft.

    Boeing, facing a 13-month-old freeze on deliveries of the 737 MAX and now disruption to deliveries of larger planes due to the coronavirus epidemic, said it had delivered 50 planes in the first quarter, barely a third of the 149 seen a year earlier.

    • michael norton

      Qatar Airways has warned its employees of “substantial” redundancies as it struggles with a collapse in demand.
      Coronavirus: Virgin Atlantic to cut 3,000 jobs and quit Gatwick
      BA may not reopen at Gatwick once pandemic passes

      so it is down hill for airlines and their staff.

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