Brexit live stream with Julian Assange, Brian Eno, Craig Murray and many other guests. 201


In a first-of-its-kind, live broadcast from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Julian Assange and an exciting panel of special guests will discuss the Brexit referendum, its context and its repercussions over the course of six hours on the evening of this historic vote.
Tune in, to see the coverage of Brexit that you won’t see on the BBC.

Live from http://brexitclub.eu/

Replay below.

[Posted by Admin

Craig’s flight from Edinburgh was delayed and he will join as soon as he can]


201 thoughts on “Brexit live stream with Julian Assange, Brian Eno, Craig Murray and many other guests.

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  • Herbie

    To be fair to Laura Kuennsberg she had this story much earlier on. Dave’s going.

    When everyone else was saying Boris was having a nap, he wasn’t telling Dave what’s what.

    • Tom

      Or the Leave side made a better job of the vote-rigging.
      The whole thing stinks to me.

      • Tony_0pmoc

        That too is a possibility. If we had stayed in The EU, we would eventually have The Euro, and the City of London would be completely neutered, and Europe’s Financial Capital would move to Germany. I have never been of the view that all Security Services are on the same side.

  • RobG

    Ha! I’m listening to the resignation speech that isn’t. Davy Lad is going to hang on until the tory party conference in September, then the new leader will “start thinking about invoking article 50”. Corbyn, who was holding his nose during the Remain campaign, has said this morning that article 50 should be invoked straight away.

    It will be interesting to see what happens over the next 3 months, and whether they will attempt to make this referendum disapear. It’s now so totally corrupt that I wouldn’t put it past them.

    Talking of which, in the final stages the bookies had Remain at 1-7, which is mind-bendingly odds-on.

    • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

      That false god Mr Jeremy Corbyn, having offered very half-hearted support to the Remain campaign, is now calling for the immediate invocation of Article 50 TEU.

      This man is truly a whore.

      • Herbie

        He’s trying to save the British people from the banking thieves.

        Anyway, Project for a New American century well down the tubes now.

        Wouldn’t surprise me if the western EU leaders decided in secret to scupper the whole CIA funded project and start again.

        • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

          Herbie

          I wonder what it would take for some people to stop banging away about the EEC/EU being some sort of diabolical American-inspired project from start to finish.

          The creation of the EEC in the 1950s was certainly supported by the US.

          For what good reason should it not have been?

          Big-picture wise, I mean 🙂

          • Herbie

            Because it lead inevitably, despite better earlier leadership, to Europe becoming America’s bitch.

            That’s the EU’s main problem today.

            It can’t make its own independent decisions and its got eastern European lunatics and Russian haters who will doom it further to eternal American bitchdom.

            “Fuck the EU”

            And they did!

          • deepgreenpuddock

            I know what you mean by:
            “The creation of the EEC in the 1950’s was supported by the US” but it is somewhat disingenuous to suppose that the Us position was entirely benign or altruistic. I suppose it was a strategic position that was adopted in the context of a devastated post war Europe, the developing cold war,and the fast declining British empire, so in many ways US choices were opportunistic and self- interested to the point of a disregard of wider harms, and driven-as always by people invested in spurious ideologies and ‘magic’ beliefs. While I agree we need to withdraw from the notion of conspiracy as it does not provide a platform for open discussion( more of an intellectual refuge or reflexive foetal position), but at the same time it is wrong to dismiss this anger and fear with the confected air of superiority that you display.
            9/11 may not have been a conspiracy but it sure as hell was a monumental and disastrous fuck -up with appalling consequences and i have not the slightest doubt that a great deal of information about it is withheld, no doubt for security reasons,(although one suspects this is bogus ) -there is a considerable obscuring and cover up of the full circumstances) in order to preserve the careers of those in powerful places. Essentially it is the suppression or inhibition of accountability. I prefer the expression ‘accountability’. While some people may dissolve into fits of irrational conspiracising, it is still perfectly valid to question the accountability of people and ‘process’ where it undoubtedly fails.
            One point- you say you know Juncker- and feel able to pass comment on his abilities, so what about you identifiying yourself, and exposing the ethos (in the classical sense) of your grand supra-intelectual dismissals, without response from those exposed your withering wind.
            I also have more sympathy for Jeremy Corbyn. The ‘anonymous’ condemnation from some Labour MP in the Guardian this a.m. (essentially about not having a clue on campaign organisation and motivation etc) is slightly disappointing. The Labour party found itself ‘pre- positioned’ by the Blair /Brown Nulabour years, and their appalling failures to anticipate or plan for the pressures that were inevitable and predictable (and also measurable and modifiable post fact).
            I also see recriminations being heaped on him for the lack lustre campaign and his inability to deliver the remain vote but I strongly suspect that that the labour working class brexit element was undeliverable by anyone by the time the campaign started.
            The degree of entrenched venom is illustrated by the monstrous murder of Jo Cox.
            We should also not forget that the exposure to real harms that I have not a shadow of doubt, this referendum result will bring about , was done to shore up and sustain the Tory party, mainly in England.
            I am utterly sure that there will be some wry regrets over the next few years, that recriminations and social disruption will follow, and not a few people will be thinking ‘be careful what you wish for’.

      • Macky

        Richard Seymour on Corbyn;

        “Corbyn did the best he could in this scenario, offering a conditional, critical defence of Remain. Had he joined in the ra-ra cheerleading for the EU, had he not prefaced his support with some serious criticisms, Labour would be looking at a bleak scenario in these mid-to-north England areas which have gone Brexit. By at least sounding critical, and above all keeping his distance from the Tories, he has probably avoided a Scottish outcome for the party in these areas.”

      • Ba'al Zevul

        Corbyn knows very well that the remainers are heading rapidly for the long grass. Once again, he’s showing more acuity than you credit him with. Though perhaps more optimism than is realistic. Still, target – rapidly disappearing rabbit, two rounds, fire.

    • Tom Welsh

      Someone should tell Dave that he is redundant, surplus to requirements, an ex-PM. His boss (the British people) has just given him an order: get us out of the EU. He should snap to it double quick if he doesn’t want his arse kicked.

  • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

    Here is some further instruction from Habbabkuk for the edification of readers.

    !/. Herbie is right when he wrote that this referendum was not only – or even primarily – about EU membership.
    It should be seen, primarily, as an expression of mistrust vis a vis the political classes. The same phenomenon that brought Syriza – whose program was, from the start, unrealistic to any rational thinker – to power in Greece. A powerful factor – as with Mr Tsipras – was the belief that the leaders of the Brexit campaign were not part of the political classes and somehow represented the people as opposed to the old political insiders: a mistaken belief, but there you are.

    2/. As I predicted, there will be no political chaos at Westminster. PM Cameron will make way for a new leader (and PM) in due course. Readers will recall that he had already said that he would not be leading his party into the next general election. Furthermore: his imminent departure enables him not to have to deliver on his promise that in the event of a leave vote he would immediately trigger Article 50 of the EU Treaty. Indeed, his speech this morning made clear that the decision when to trigger Article 50 would be for his successor (in this connection, let us recall that Boris Johnson nd Michael Gove are on record of having advised him not to rush into triggering that Article.

    3/. In retrospect, the Remain campaign was lamentable…and largely incredible. PM Cameron and consorts would have done better if they had not handed out easy favours to the Brexiteers such as predicting the possibility of a Third World War following exit. And the Remain leaders should have encouraged various interested outsiders, starting with President Obama and going through various other foreign personalities and international institutions, to keep their mouths shut. More should have been made of the IFS, less of the IMF.

    All for now, Habbabkuk is due to attend a Satanic Conference in hal an hour; the agenda: how to accelerate the downfall of civilisation as we know it (Bilderbergers and Rothschilds also invited).

    • michael norton

      I am stunned, I did not think they would allow us to get freedom.
      Anyone know how the postal votes decided?

      • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

        Can we please have an end to this bollocks of “they” (who they?) would not allow it?

        The Conspiracists, having had their fun, should now keep quiet for a while.

        • Tony_0pmoc

          For years I have been trying to work out if its a case of naivety, old age or psychological manipulation.

  • Tony_0pmoc

    At around 7:00 am, The President of The EU – whoever he is (I can’t remember) more or less said – can you now LEAVE as quickly as possible. Go Away NOW.

    I think that is the first time I have agreed with The President of The EU.

    It was as if he had just caught his wife in his bed with his best friend.

    Tony

    • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

      He wasn’t saying quite that and certainly not in the sense in which you have chosen to understand it, Tony.

      Mr Juncker is lightweight but subtle. I know him.

    • michael norton

      FRENCH president Francois Hollande has called an emergency meeting following Britain’s decision to leave the European Union as calls for a Frexit heightened. Ministers in the French Government will meet before 8am (UK time) at an emergency meeting chaired by Hollande to discuss its reponse to the UK’s decison to untangle itself from the 28-nation bloc.

      The Leave camp officially passed the winning mark just after six o’clock this morning as voters demanded Britain leave Europe.

      Far-right National Front leader Marine Le Pen has already called for an EU referendum after she threw her weight behind the Brexit camp.

      This morning she repeated her previous calls for a “Frexit” following the historic vote – which saw the Leave campaign win more than 52 per cent of the votes.
      http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/682966/EU-referendum-Brexit-France-calls-emergency-meeting-Francois-Hollande

      I expect Francois Hollande will also have to fall on his sword.
      France is in utter CHAOS

      • michael norton

        Brexit would be ‘irreversible’, France’s Hollande warns UK

        Thanks

      • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

        France is not in utter chaos and the chances of France leaving the EU are as small as Mme Le Pen becoming the President of France.

        Calm down, everyone.

        • Herbie

          The game ain’t over yet.

          And it’ll be a game of surprises all the way.

          Big big stakes.

          • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

            On the contrary, Herbie.

            Anyone who can see the bigger picture will not be surprised by how few surprises there will be.

        • Ba'al Zevul

          the chances of France leaving the EU are as small as Mme Le Pen becoming the President of France.

          Not negligible, then. FN got 17.9% of the vote last time. The immigration issue is growing in importance, we’ve just done the unthinkable and shown the way. And-

          A French sociologist, Sylvain Crépon who analysed the social and occupational groups of the FN voters in 2012, explained : “The FN vote is made up of the victims of globalisation. It is the small shopkeepers who are going under because of the economic crisis and competition from the out-of-town hypermarkets; it is low-paid workers from the private sector; the unemployed. The FN scores well among people living in poverty, who have a real fear about how to make ends meet.”[278] Crépon also analysed the increase of the FN vote in “rural” areas and the recent sociological changes in these areas made up of small provincial towns and new housing-estate commuter belts built on the distant outskirts of the cities : “The rural underclass is no longer agricultural. It is people who have fled the big cities and the inner suburbs because they can no longer afford to live there. Many of these people will have had recent experience of living in the banlieues (high immigration suburbs) – and have had contact with the problems of insecurity.”[278] Commentators also pointed that there are more young people and women voting for the party in 2012.[278] (Wikipedia)

          Sound familiar? That’s your Brexit voter.

          • nevermind

            66% of French are deeply dissatisfied with the EU and said that they would leave given the chance, an almighty relief for the CAP budget if I may say so.
            Calais customs agreements will be annulled by France, they had enough of the UK concentration camp forced on to them, on their very own territory. boef
            That’s why they did not allow 120 aid supplies through.

          • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

            And in the previous French Presidential election Le Pen pere beat Lionel Jospin into third place in the first round of voting.

            The incumbent – President Chirac – then went in to win the second round by about 80% of the votes.

            Better Supermenteur than le fascho, as the saying went.

          • Habbabkuk (keep calm!)

            @ Nevermind

            What you wrote about UK extraterritorial checks in France (btw they are primarily immigration checks and not customs checks) seems to imply that such checks were non-existent previously to the Anglo-French Agreement. That is incorrect of course.

            Secondly: those checks could be carried out by the ferry companies themselves (probably aided by security firms) before the lorries are allowed on board, as was the case before.

            Admittedly, that would probably take more time than at present and slow down loading. However, anyone who has seen the volume of continental traffic going to the UK (as opposed to the volume of UK transporters going in the opposite direction) will understand that such slow-downs would disproportionally affect UK-bound continental transporters. And since time is money, one could imagine that there might be considerable pressure on the French authorities not to rescind the Anglo-French Agreement from quarters other than the UK.

            It must be admitted, however, that matters would be more difficult as far as Eurostar/Eurotunnel lpassenger and freight traffic traffic from Paris and Brussels (and further afield) is concerned.

          • Herbie

            But it’s not about electing Le Pen is it, habby.

            That’s just a red herring.

            The point being made is that increasing numbers of French want their own in/out referendum.

      • Ba'al Zevul

        The plaster is beginning to fall off the badly-built facade, isn’t it? Some disturbing parallels between the EU and the Weimar Republic are visible. And the longstanding pretence that people don’t instinctively distrust people unlike them is biting back. Racism is inherent in H.sapiens, not optional, and taking humane account of that, rather than suppressing it by ‘education’ would be a far wiser course for our leaders.

        That should attract some fury…

        • Herbie

          I suppose if I were going to force mass immigration upon a population, I’d ensure firstly that they felt well enough off that it bothered them less.

          What these buggers did is force mass immigration upon a population already increasingly desitute and depressed by the pointlessness of their lives, and laughed at them day and daily in media, all the while showing off their ridiculous wealth.

          Those who did that were at best pygmy pols.

          • Richard

            Yes, that’s a pretty good summation of what has been happening. And I’m pretty sure that the elite still don’t get it. They give every indication of believing their own propaganda.

            They’ve chucked everything at the people of this country, foreign leaders, former American defence secretaries, banks leaders, financial “experts” (ha!), blatant threats, luvvies, the ever-impartial B.B.C. and you name it and still the majority of them refused to buy it. I’m proud of them. Frankly, though I voted ‘Leave’, I didn’t think they still had it in them to stand up to power and tell them to bugger off. How happy I am to have been proved wrong. And how telling it is that the part of the country which bangs on most about ‘independence’ produced the largest vote for ‘Remain’. You really can fool some of the people all of the time.

          • Ba'al Zevul

            Poor old Teach, a man out of his time. Nowadays he’d be selling unsecured derivatives and mentoring financial entrepreneurs with no risk of being topped at all. O tempora, O mores. For myself I have to acknowledge an affinity with the sea and a tendency to say “aaaar” at inappropriate moments. Sadly I cannot afford an eyepatch.

        • nevermind

          As a country without a leader, with the 1922 committee in charge of the right wing course, is a very good indication of the Weimar republic.

          Now, as then, the plebs are still waiting for more of the same. Bring it on Boris.

    • michael norton

      Thanks Rob

      There is barely a week, Brussels was starting to panic at the prospect of a “Brexit”. Then the polls have become more favorable after the murder of pro-European Labour MP and Jo Cox. And leaders of community institutions were recovering hoped that the British will opt for the status quo. However, they have actively prepared the next day. They are desperate to avoid a possible domino effect and cut the grass under the feet of the countries that might be tempted to emulate London in order to preserve the European project.

      In case of victory of “Brexit” European leaders had planned to play down the situation and to enter as soon as possible in divorce proceedings. Their message? If the “Brexit” prevails, the British do not think they’re going to continue to take advantage of the internal market without participating in the EU budget. “Leave means clustering leave” ( “if you leave, you leave”), insists the German Manfred Weber, President of the European People’s Party (conservative) to the European Parliament, close to Chancellor Angela Merkel.

      • michael norton

        So even the scum of Brussels
        were hoping the death of Jo Cox would save their collective bacon.
        how despicable.

  • RobG

    Interesting regional results:

    Scotland remain 62%
    Wales leave 52.5%
    Northern Ireland remain 55.8%
    London remain 59.9%
    Rest of England leave 57%

  • Tony_0pmoc

    I might start watching the football now. I reckon a good final would be England vs Wales if that is actually possible. Seen less than 5 minutes so far.

  • Herbie

    Mandelslime now saying that Corbyn should go as well.

    But Mandy would have taken us into the Euro.

    Now that would have been a major fuck up.

    Up for it big time he was:

    Here’s the shifty git trying to weasel his way out of it when the whole thing went to shit:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRMw_42p-HY

    • Richard

      Frankly, Cameron has surprised me. Nothing became him in his (political) life like the leaving of it. In order to emulate him, Corbyn would have to be an honourable man. If Corbyn were an honourable man, he would have stuck to his guns and thrown his weight behind Brexit instead of bottling it when it really mattered. Labour need decent and honourable left-wingers like Hoey, Field, Mann, the late Peter Shore, Callaghan, Gaitskill – people who are in touch with their core voters instead of treating them like dirt. Many of the dead ones have effectively been written out of history. How a supposedly socialist party ever elected Blair, Mandelson, Chuckus Yermoney and other elitist tossers I really don’t know, but they’ve already lost Scotland, possibly for ever, and England and Wales might yet go the same way.

        • Richard

          Dunno, perhaps I got the name wrong, I’m not very good with names. However, ‘populist’ is a word I’ve heard quite a lot over the last twelve hours or so, generally, as far as I can see, in yet another attempt to be pejorative.

          ‘Right wing’ is also an interesting term. The point is 1) that there has always existed a positive, socialist case for ‘Brexit’ and 2) you wouldn’t know that from listening to the current leaders of the Labour party.

  • Tony_0pmoc

    The sound and vision from The Brexit live stream was surprisingly good – except for the external guests where the sound was so awful, that I could barely make a word out. Surely all that was needed to dramatically improve the sound was a TV or PC with an audio out and a cable.

  • Fly on the wall

    Article 50 can come later, but ANYBODY hiring an illegal should be fined £50,000 and stopped from doing business wef TODAY. A points immigration system be put in place immediately too. The woolly bearded labour party do-gooding fools who think its humanitarian to displace the millions of us indigenous animals and take in the hundreds of millions of hungrier species (CMs Rumanians!) from all over the world, should be barred from any political discourse.

    Its not only about relegating our citizens to lower wages/zero hours but its much more important to make it clear that the UK is no longer a haven for millions of economic refugees, otherwise we will have hordes crossing from France,etc onto our shores exactly like whats happening from Libya to Italy.

    • Yossi

      If in your imaginary world those things came about, who would you then use as useful scapegoats for the continuing deficiencies in our society?

      • michael norton

        If Ted Heath was still alive, Marget Thatcher would be pissing on him.

  • nevermind

    don’t you just love the smell of burning human rights in the morning. Now go and insist on exit polls for the next Indy Ref.

    Those who want to help me by handing me a Webley, want to see me dead in not so many words, you’ve tried before. Yawn

  • Tom

    Looks as though you’ll get your referendum now, Craig. Congratulations.
    I’d get out of this disastrous mess the Westminster establishment and their media cronies have created while you can.

      • nevermind

        the master has arrived, hail the master. Love to play a round of Golf with him, be really nice to him for 9 holes , and once you got your aim, go for the man not the hole, cats get nine chances. A tree iron will do.

        • Brianfujisan

          Hullo Nevermind

          How have you been keeping

          I was down recently at Turnberry ( Now Trump Turnberry ) The locals, and folks of Girvan aint amused, and rightly so, Turnberry Lighthouse is now Called Trump Turnberry Lighthouse

          £ 3.500 PP a night $£$£$£$£$£$

          • nevermind

            Hi Brian, good to hear your voice again, we are fine, I’m still totally shell shocked from last nights result, the end of UKIP and the end of the EU from Frexit to Swexit, they are all having difficulties with the EU Commissioners unaccountable dictat.

            My head is not switching off, this calamity, almost a sign, will have serious consequences, Scotland will leave the union, N Ireland, despite the opposition of unionists, could easily join the RoIreland as they both voted to stay in. The small matter of Gibraltar once again become a flash point further complicates matters.
            The EU wants negotiations sorted in six month, one must not wait and sulk, so get in there MEP’s and ministers, don’t waste your time stabbing each other in the back, get going, you wanted control over your affairs so desperately.

            I’m depressed I think, that does not happen often.

  • RobG

    Some things to perhaps watch out for: Cameron did not resign this morning (as I believe he should have done). Instead he announced his intention to resign in 3 months time, and he said he would leave it to his successor to invoke article 50, which will make Britain’s exit from the EU legally binding.

    A referendum is advisory rather than mandatory. Yesterday’s Leave vote does not put any legal obligation on the government to carry through the wishes of the people.

    The can has been kicked at least 3 months down the road, and anything can happen in 3 months (I think that’s why Corbyn’s first reaction was to say that article 50 should be invoked immediately).

    https://next.ft.com/content/5b82031e-1056-31e1-8e0e-4e91774e27f1

    • Ba'al Zevul

      Sorry, three months it is. Cameron having his Eton mess and eating it as usual. But Tony The Talking Head’s instant self-exposure was too entertaining to miss. It confirms this pained piece by Peter Oborne, last year, incidentally:

      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-3328000/PETER-OBORNE-David-Cameron-truly-heir-Tony-Blair.html

      Agree with your other points. Triumphalism is premature, and the hedge fund money is on a cop-out, whoever’s in charge. (The electronic traders have probably filled their boots during the wild fluctuations in the pound this week, and we can probably expect that to continue, too.)

    • Tony_0pmoc

      I don’t see how we cannot LEAVE. Everyone (except perhaps the Americans) have already accepted the decision. Whilst The EU et al crapped all over The Greek Peoples’ decision – they can’t crap all over this. At least the illusion of Democracy has to be maintained, and this decision may actually keep it alive and reverse the process of World Elite Dictatorship. The NWO neocon dictatorship is stunned – just look at Tony Blair crying.

      Its perfectly reasonable that Cameron continues for a short time, until he is replaced, and I thought his speech surprisingly good under the circumstances. Many people are going to be concerned about the implications including Brits in Europe as well Rumanians and Polish in Britain.

      Anything could happen next, like for example Deutsche Bank going tits up – and pulling some of the rest with them.

      Tony

  • Trowbridge H. Ford aka The Biscuit

    Must say that my worst fears about referenda were realized.

    It’s the end of the world, as we know it.

    It’s the British version of Trumpism Triumphant, as he must have suspected by dropping by.

    Will the UK survive? Will even Great Britain survive?

    I doubt it.

    The real winners here are Russia and China.

    And if the USA doesn’t get the message about The Donald’s dangerousness, it will be a victim too.

    People suck when it comes to serious politics.

    • michael norton

      Keith Vaz

      “Frankly, in a thousand years I would never have believed that the British people would have voted this way,”
      it’ll be catastrophic for our country, for the rest of Europe and indeed the world.”
      Mr Vaz predicted an emergency summit in Europe,
      warning of “huge implications” for counter-terrorism, co-operation on migration and other key policy issues.

      So, Keith Vaz is a bit upset.
      GOOD

    • Tony_0pmoc

      Trowbridge, So you’re on The Team too? I suppose I should have guessed. You normally make sense, except about 9/11, but that is understandable.

      My wife has just returned from Yoga class…now this is the last place I could imagine, where someone could completely lose the plot…I said what the hell are you doing talking politics in a Yoga class? She simply answered a question and with a smile on her face said she was pleased.

      If the decision had gone the other way, there is no way she would have reacted like that.

      Maybe they’ve had the Common Purpose treatment, and realise the implications.

      Tony

        • Herbie

          The plunge into the abyss started with the petrodollar.

          And the US getting used to free stuff for their paper.

          911 was the mechanism for continuing the free ride…

    • Herbie

      Why doesn’t Europe just let those Chinese build their silk road and trade routes overland.

      And trade with them.

    • Ba'al Zevul

      NO. Not another bloody referendum. FFS. Unless it’s for compulsory muzzles for politicians and op-ed writers. How the hell do you write a vote-for-joe polling slip covering all the options, anyway?

        • Squonk

          Looks like the US Plunge Protection Team members have been dragged out of bed early. Big money seems to be attempting to stabilise things. All eyes on US open in a couple of hours…

      • Herbie

        That’s just the greedy bankers gambling.

        Up shares, down shares.

        It’s all cobblers.

        We haven’t had a real market since these fuckers were let back out of their box in the 80’s..

        All the more reason to return to a productive economy. You know, like making things. Proper jobs. Trading etc.

        It’s a terrible thing when real lives, real economies are destroyed by fuckers playing games with the tokens of exchange.

        Tail wagging dog, big time, and oh so pointless for most of humanity.

        • deepgreenpuddock

          nice idea but the twenty years in between is the bit that worries me.

          • Jim

            Herbie :

            Do you’re a huge Javid fan? Even a cursory glance at the proposals outlined in the link you provided show he’s up to his neck in the sort of neo-liberal, deregulating, Thatcherite economics you spend half your waking life railing against. What planet are you guys on? Every xenophobic racist far right party leader in Europe is whooping with joy, and you and others on here are joining in their party. If you can’t see the illogic in your position…

          • Ba'al Zevul

            And there I agree with Jim. The other signature, Osborne’s, should have rung your warning bells, quite apart from the crafty spinning of hardball financial opinion as being socially desirable. Yes, I agree investment is necessary to correct the imbalance between service industries – and their lousy employment practices – and the generation of real value offering fair rewards. No question. However, the paper claims that employment has risen (hooray) and the next stage is to make employment more productive. This is toryspeak for ‘more work for less security’ rather than ‘full-time fair employment for all’ It implies extension of the flexible labour concept, and it takes no account of the infrastructure problems so comprehensively unaddressed by Osborne, like the impossibility of living on a low wage in London.

            Its the same old, same old. Pretty wrapping, voodoo doll named ‘Growth’ inside, paid for by the many, and presented as if Osborne actually cared. If there were such a thing as a free market, it would do a great deal better than that. Although it would be just as unsustainable.

          • Herbie

            My point to the questioner was simply that “even” Sajid Javid saw the necessity of such a strategy.

            So, it’s an across the board concern.

            No one has to implement Javid’s answer to the letter, but across the board, across the political divide, the necessity is seen to be there.

    • fedup

      Number of fucks given ZERO!

      Let the tossers get on with it, those swine have nothing to do with us we the people the standard issue citizens, and don’t buy the usual homilies of; pensions funds and share holders. Only 17.5% of stock and shares are owned by institutions and insurance companies combined. All of the song and dance about the markets and indexes are pure propaganda.

      In case of North Koreans the tabloids make fun out of their propaganda in our own case everyone of them reports the movements of shares, as though a sizeable portion of our populations are shareholders and their incomes depends on the dividends and movements of stocks thereof. A total myth!

    • michael norton

      “including more than £480 on 22 cushions” ( at our expense, bless him.)

      Mr Cushions Vaz, the chairman of the home affairs select committee,
      also switched his designated second home from the £545,000 flat to a house in his Leicester East constituency and back again in the space of a year.
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mps-expenses/5298267/Keith-Vaz-75000-for-a-flat-12-miles-from-home.html
      Mr Vaz, the chairman of the home affairs select committee, also switched his designated second home from the £545,000 flat to a house in his Leicester East constituency and back again in the space of a year.
      Keith Vaz: £75,000 for a flat 12 miles from home

      Mr Vaz’s main home is a house in Stanmore, north-west London, that he bought with his wife Maria for £1.15 million in November 2005. They live there with their two children.

      The house is less than a mile from Stanmore underground station, which takes passengers directly to Westminster on the Jubilee Line. According to Transport for London, the 14-stop journey should take about 37 minutes.

      His living arrangements will leave him open to the same questions asked of Tony McNulty, the employment minister, who claimed for a house about the same distance away lived in by his parents.

      Documents filed with Commons officials showed that between 2004 and April 2007, Mr Vaz claimed more than £69,000 for expenses at the flat in Westminster, which he bought in 2003. He moved in shortly after selling another for £312,000.

        • Herbie

          A big fat bum on silk cushions.

          Yup, silk cushions.

          From John Lewis.

          Nothing but the best when the taxpayer’s footing the bill.

          • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

            I should hardly describe cushions from John Lewis as “nothing but the best”.

          • Habbabkuk (chickens, counting, hatched)

            I mean, to take another example from John Lewis, they sell very nice and very good naturally-filled duvets for £100 – £300.

            But you can pay well over a thousand quid for a top quality German made one.

          • Herbie

            Well it’s upper mid range kinda thing.

            But much much too good for anyone sucking at the taxpayer’s tit.

  • Loony

    Although subjected to a barrage of lies, blackmail, misinformation, misdirection and concerted establishment pressure the British have fulfilled their historic duty.

    They have delivered a decisive blow to the corrupt and rotting edifice that is the EU, By their actions they have blown open a hole through which the nations of southern Europe can escape from the permanent economic depression that the euro demands that they endure.

    For the French the British have provided a tranquil sun dappled lane lane through which they can meander to their freedom. There is no need to rekindle the revolutionary spirit, no need to sharpen the guillotine, as the path is marked and can be negotiated free of material hindrance. (All that is asked of you is that you do not build Hinckley Point). The path is wide and broad enough to accommodate the Dutch and the Danes also.

    Merkel remains free to continue to wreak havoc within her own German borders – but surely now the nations to the East will be sufficiently galvanized to decisively see off attempts to export her brand of deranged humanitarianism to within their borders. Perhaps Germany can merge with Sweden and together they can imprison all men who prefer to urinate whilst standing.

    As for the Irish surely “We Can Work It Out” – So sang Paul McCartney the descendant of Irish immigrants.

    Scotland should be free to do as it chooses – but those who view Scotland with affection have a duty to ensure that the Scots understand that the EU no longer exists in anything other than mirage form. Resentment or distrust of the English does not make it sensible to seek unity with a mirage.

    As EU functionaries come to terms with the terminal damage inflicted on their nightmarish vision surely now they will be too distracted to continue shoveling money that they do’t have into the bottomless pit of Ukrainian neo-Nazism.

    The ability of the British to see conventional wisdom for the unconventional stupidity that it really is may embolden the US populace to act to prevent the bizarre death cult ideology so perfectly embodied in the form of Hillary Clinton from assuming power.

    No doubt in its death spasms the EU and its acolytes will make some form of final grasp for life. They have no history of paying attention to reality, and I am not hopeful that they will hear much less understand the words of Stuart Copeland

    “Wield the Spade
    Ready the blade
    Sacrifices must be made”

    • Tony_0pmoc

      Loony, Compared to the crap you were writing yesterday (were you taking the piss?), that was both brilliant and very funny.

  • Herbie

    Yeahbut.

    Hodge.

    She’s kinda orbiting elite that one.

    What’s she doing in a Labour party.

      • michael norton

        straw dogs

        good film that

        if memory serves, set in Cornwall before the U.K. joined the Common Market.
        In the recent Euro-Ref.
        Cornwall voted decicively
        OUT

    • Jim

      You were posting approving links to Sajid Javid’s economic proposals half an hour ago, where does that leave you?

      • Herbie

        I don’t approve his proposals.

        I’m simply saying that “even” he sees the necessity.

        It’s an across the board concern.

        So, it’s Overton Window for both public and across the political divide at national level.

  • Mark Golding

    Agent Cameron has said he will not invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty which is legally binding. What happens ahead is a matter of politics not law. It will come down to what is politically expedient and practicable.

    In fact this neo-Conservative government will suspend acting on the British people’s vote to exit the EU for 3 months to explain it away and characterise it in terms that it has no credibility or binding effect AND WILL try to re-negotiate another deal and put that to another referendum.

    What is clear to me is two-fold: (1) First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon begin preparing the legislation for a new vote on Scottish independence and (2) seizing this government and making the Article 50 notification as soon as possible without preconditions.

    http://blogs.ft.com/westminster/liveblogs/2016-06-24/?ft_site=falcon&desktop=true

  • Manda

    I enjoyed this until 1.30 am when I flaked out! A huge thanks to WikiLeaks, Assange and all of you who participated in a refreshing and worthwhile change to corporate media output on elections.

    • Manda

      Their immorality and arrogance knows no bounds like their idol Blair, whose policies were very similar to the Tories and Lib Dems.

      George Galloway is saying they may then elect their own leader of PLP and ask the speaker to acknowledge that leader. Leaving a leader of PLP/opposition and Corbyn as leader of the Labour party. I cannot believe such a procedure is in place! Vicious forces are at work in modern politics, they must be routed out.

  • lysias

    The fact that “they” were defeated does not prove that “they” do not exist. The true margin of victory for Brexit may have been too great for them to overcome.

  • Tony M

    The picture was jerky, the sound had shades of the Daleks, my poor little AMD Duron almost lost its magic smoke, an Craig Murray must have been in the loo. Disappointed at the Assange super-villain HQ, no mono-rail, no stainless-steel pond filled with piranha fish and no startled looking fluffy white cat.

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