Invest in a TESSA 3


The Guardian’s editor Alan Rusbridger still tries to defend his personal friend Tessa Jowell. From today’s Guardian Leader:

“Ms Jowell has been acquitted by a questionable procedure. That does not make her guilty; a less questionable procedure would very likely acquit her too.”

Oh yes. A genuinely independent judge would have no difficulty believing that her husband did not tell her for four years that he received a $600,000 gift, or that she saw nothing to indicate the mortgage had been paid off. Or that when she then remortgaged the same house again – twice – it did not occur to her that this would not be a problem if, as she claims, she believed the first mortgage had not been paid off.

Let me rephrase my “Does anyone believe her?” question. Does anyone believe her except Alan Rusbridger and Michael White? We all wait for Polly Toynbee’s article entitled “Money laundering is OK if you have a peg on your nose.”

(I suppose I ought to explain that. At the last general election, Polly Toynbee’s Guardian column urged voters to vote New Labour but to show their disapproval of the illegal war on Iraq by wearing a peg on their nose while they did it.)

Craig


3 thoughts on “Invest in a TESSA

  • Chuck Unsworth

    Rusbridging

    ? VERB

    1 put something over or in front of (someone or something) so as to protect or conceal. 2 try to hide or deny the fact of (a wrongful action). 8 protect (an exposed person) by shooting at the enemy or creating a diversion.

    ? NOUN

    1 something that covers or protects. 2 a thick protective outer part. 3 shelter: they ran for Rusbridging. 4 support for a friend in danger. 5 a means of concealing an illegal or secret activity.

    ? PHRASES

    'Rusbridge' suddenly seek shelter when being pursued. 'To Rusbridger' (informal) take steps to avoid attack or criticism. under cover of 1 concealed by. 2 while pretending to do something.

    ? DERIVATIVES Rusbridger, noun, person who Rusbridges

  • eeore

    I find it odd that she was cleared, since she admits to finding out about the money in August 2004, and didn't declare it: ergo she broke the code.

  • richard

    It's all very easy for you to criticise, Craig, but in these perilous times tough choices have to be made. The rules of the game are changing, and if the only way to guarantee the safety and security of hardworking families is for our politicians to pocket ?350,000 bungs and then lie about it afterwards, then I for one am glad that we have a government willing to bite the bullet.

    Let me put it another way: What if a terrorist had planted a nuclear device in central London and the only way to stop it from going off was for Tessa Jowell to take a ?350,000 bribe from an Italian millionaire and then lie about it afterwards?

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