The Quality of MPs 33


We are increasingly hearing the argument from our MPs that if you pay rubbish, you will get rubbish.

There are two problems with that argument. The first is that Nadira and Cameron yesterday left the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, where the nurses and midwives are indeed paid rubbish, but were still absolutely brilliant.

They were motivated by something alien to so many of our MPs, a genuine care for people. They were also, for the most part, a standing rebuke to UKIP, BNP and others who knock immigrants and the role they play in our society.

The second and clinching argument is that our MPs have been looking after themselves extremely well, but they are for the most part of abysmal quality. (The same could be said of our top bankers).

In fact, the reverse of the argument is true. If you make it a gravy train, you get people who are primarily interested in gravy. Like Malik and Moran.

I was reminded forcibly on this when writing my recent post about Michael Foot. I noted that his biography of Byron, The Politics of Paradise, is one of my favourite books. He sat in a Parliament which contained scholars of the highest order. Enoch Powell, Robert Rhodes James, Roy Jenkins, Tony Crosland and Michael Foot are only some of the politicians of that generation who wrote books which retain academic authority. (Don’t choke. Powell was arguably the World’s leading authority on Herodotus).

In the current parliament I can only think of lowbrow effusions. Brown’s curious ghost-written monographs “On courage” are, I think, meant to point up his own courage in overcoming his (genuine) misfortunes. Michael Gove’s mad Melanie Phillips style anti-Islamic rants are astonishingly ill-researched and of no academic use except as a study in prejudice.

In fact for the vast majority of MP’s, it is hard to imagine them reading a book. let alone writing one.


33 thoughts on “The Quality of MPs

1 2
  • KevinB

    The people who say that the only way to recruit people of the right ‘calibre’ is to offer them the prospect of a bulging bank account only reveal to us their own crass perspective.

    I want to be represented by persons of character. Men and women who cannot be bought.

    One is much more likely to find such individuals amongst the moderately paid than, for instance, the lawyer classes.

    The truth is that power and money tend to go to the ambitious. i.e. as should be obvious, to those that determinedly pursue…….that’s it, power and money.

    From the Christian perspective this is a ‘sinful’ mindset. Christ explicitly said, “Do not be ambitious”…..He was saying that a soul that is ambitious misdirects itself……he did not bother stating the obvious, that spiritually blind materialism and power-lust inevitably will leave a lot of casualties strewn in its wake.

    One great consequence of our collective materialistic ambition is a robbed, impoverished and powerless third-world.

    The role of banking (the World Bank particularly) is, as with all else, central in fostering this moral turpitude upon our careless souls.

    Like most people, I want representatives who are not slaves to any money-power, who serve not just their constituents…..but truth and justice in a much wider world.

    Is the best place to find such types the higher echelons of the business class….?

    ….. umm, don’t think so.

    eddie, put a sock in it, you nitwit. You don’t even understand what racism is.

  • Keith Tully

    At every election there are on average 5 decent people trying to get elected on our awful first past the post system.But as you are aware the winner in 70 p/c of seats is a cert.I

  • Keith Tully

    At every election there are on average 5 decent people trying to get elected on our awful first past the post system.But as you are aware the winner in 70 p/c of seats is a cert.Its time for a fair PR voting system like Scotland has.

1 2

Comments are closed.