Confessions of a Secret Europhile 224

I remain a committed internationalist. For me, nation states are potentially extremely dangerous entities. They have the power to co-erce, brutalise and even lawfully to kill their own citizens. They regulate economic, commercial and societal transactions. They wield such power that contest among internal political leaders for control of that power can erupt into violent civil war. And they control such physical resources that nation states can launch war on each other in order to annex those resources or access their benefits.

Western democracy has, in my view, in general been the happiest form of government in modern society, in controlling the internal use of power through democratic mechanisms and in spreading welfare benefits among its citizens, while allowing the economy to function relatively efficiently.

But there have been three developments to jolt us from the notion that the emergence of western democracy represents a development in an inexorable trend of human progress. The notion of historical “progress” is one in which my generation was brought up implicitly to believe. I for one believed in it consciously and explicitly.

The first and most obvious development is the realisation that, while western democracies have more or less eliminated open violence in their internal political arrangements for control of resources, they are increasingly liable to resort to open warfare to gain control over the benefit of the resources of other nations, particularly as those resources become more scarce and valuable. Anybody who truly believes that it is coincidence that Iraq, Libya and Central Asia are hydrocarbon rich, and the major areas of Western military activity, is wilfully blind. There was nothing new about neo-imperialism and its recent manifestation as liberal interventionism is no more than a rehash of standard imperial propaganda on the spreading of civilised values.

What is new is the destruction of the notion that we Western democracies had got morally better and had moved on from the crude war as resource grab. What is also new is the extraordinary use of modern mass media to propagandise the inhabitants of western democracies into such fear of an alien threat, that the government can withdraw numerous liberties and extend vastly its power for everyday physical coercion – which at the most mundane level dawned on Andrew Mitchell last week. The fact that the public accepted 17,000 members of the armed forces guarding the Olympics from nobody at all, and that the armed forces were mentioned in every single public speech by a British politician or official in the Olympic ceremonies, to wild applause, gives but one example of the extraordinary militarisation of Western societies.

The second development is the galloping increase in the gap between rich and poor, in virtually every developed economy. In the UK the normalisation of the extreme concentration of wealth, and the neutering of the political forces for redistribution, constituted the real achievement of Blairism. The wealth gap between directorial and non-directorial incomes in British society has been growing at approximately ten per cent a year for two decades.

This development has been worsened by an abandonment of regulatory mechanisms that modified capitalism, and particularly the tendency of the financial services sector through oligopoly to take vast rent out of simple commercial transactions for which they should be the mere facilitator, at the same time inventing gambling transactions and other artificial processes of cash multiplication with which to tempt the wealthy and the fundholders within their own industry. The epitome of this transfer of wealth was, after the inevitable bubble disintegration, the payment by the state of huge sums to the financial services industry, using the power of the state to coerce the population through taxes to hand over sums amounting in total to several years income each.

Which leads me to the third adverse development – the concentration of media ownership in the hands of the extremely wealthy, the control by the same interests of the mainstream political parties, and therefore the lack of effective choice before the electorate on issues like the bank bailout, where the media and politicians combine to limit the sphere of public debate that will be carried to present only tiny variations on a single alternative. The same is true, for example, of the war in Afghanistan. Without an effective choice being offered to the electorate between real policy options, the notion of democracy is meaningless. That is where the western democracies now are.

Nation states, therefore, even the best of them, are dangerous entities which employ force against their own and other citizens and can be an active danger to international peace. The regulation of relations between states by international law to reduce conflict is therefore an urgent necessity. Some countries are much more danger than others: Ghana, to take one example, has never invaded anybody while the United Kingdom has at various times invaded or bombed the territory currently occupied by three quarters of the states in the World, while the United States projects deadly physical force overseas by a variety of means on a daily basis. Reining in these rogue states is a major priority.

There exists a body of international law which ad been gaining in respect and conformity in the decades since the Second World War, but both the United States and United Kingdom, and others following the neocon lead, have in recent decades driven a coach and horses right through the fabric of international law, through invasion, extraordinary rendition, torture, detention without trial, indiscriminate bombing of civilian populations, targeted extra-judicial killings by shootings or by drones, murder of journalists in war zones, and so on in a depressing litany.

Fundamental platforms of international law violated by the UK, US and their neo-con allies from the BushBlair period on include: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, The Nuremberg Principles, The Charter of the United Nations, the Geneva Conventions, and the Hague Convention. Recently the UK was proposing in effect to tear up the Vienna Convention too.

My conclusion is twofold. Firstly that international law needs to be radically strengthened in order to come back into repute. Secondly that the idea of the nation state as the basic unit of political organisation should be radically attacked; that the period of history is past in which the development of the nation state was a force for the good of its citizens and the world community.

I believe that the nation state should be attacked from top and bottom. From the bottom, as societies internationalise the idea of an ethnic basis to state boundaries becomes anachronistic. Advantage should be taken of this trend to deconstruct states from within, breaking them down into a combination of smaller states and/or of powerful autonomous regional polities. We need to see many more states split up, especially among the westen democracies but also very definitely Russia, China, India and states in their orbit.

From the top, and with particular reference to the UK, I view the European Union as an excellenct prototype of the sort of organisation that can attack the sovereignty of national states from above. Nobody dares to say this should happen – when those few Europhiles brave enough to state their beliefs talk of greater integration, they talk of “pooling sovereignty” to disguise from themselves and their listeners the fact that what they really mean is appropriating and destroying national sovereignty – and a damn good thing too.

In the UK, national schadenfruede at the problems of the Euro is almost universal across the political spectrum, which is why I trailed this as my most unpopular post ever. How foolish, British media and politicians gloat, of those silly Europeans to undertake the biggest single economic step in the history of mankind! How wise we were to stay on the sidelines sneering!

The problem of the Euro, as I observed a decade ago and everyone now agrees, is that a currency union is not really feasible without a fiscal union. The answer to that is a fiscal union. Where the European Union has gone wrong is not that it has gone too far in integration, but that it has not gone nearly far enough.

After a period of disastrous free-for-all, what we now have is a de facto fiscal union in the Eurozone in which the German government in effect dictates policy – in this case austerity policy – to everyone else. Democracy is now even more meaningless to the Greeks and Spaniards than it is to the rest of us.

The cause of this is the fundamental weakness of the European Union – its deference to the nation states it should be eliminating. Executive power within the European Union needs to be removed completely from the nation states in the Council of Ministers, or Council of German Orders as it should be better known now.

The executive body of the European Union should rather be dependent on, and largely drawn from, a majority of the European Parliament. That parliament divides along ideological, not nationalistic lines and does provide a much broader range of representation of opinion than most national parliaments.

The existing European Commission would become simply the Civil Service to this new, democratically elected, European Government. The European Commissioners themselves, devoid of administrative responsibilities which would pass to the new parliamentary ministers, might form some kind a second chamber, of a deliberative and revising nature, to the European Parliament. Rather like the US Senate, this would give a balance of due consideration to the interests of smaller nations; it might also encourage the break-up further of over-large “national” units to ensure more second chamber representation.

The question of subsidiarity and the balance of powers between the new democratic European government and national and regional governing bodies, should be the subject for a book not an article. But I would move virtually every power of a nation state either up or down. Fiscal policy, foreign policy and defence should all be exclusively at the European level.

The problems of the European Union multiplied when it adopted the philosophy of variable geometry, of inner and outer cores, of fast track and slow track members. For the single currency and single market to succeed, unity must be much tighter. If the European Union is serious about maintaining Europe’s position in the World against the mergence of China, India and South America it must conform to the logical force behind its existence. In economic terms that means not just the free movement of goods, but the free movement of capital and labour as well. So to be in the European Union should mean being in the Euro and being in Schengen too. The alternative should be to leave; and be treated as an outsider. The EFTA free ride must finish.

I view the European Union as a wonderful thing. It is a cliche to note that in my parents’ lifetime Europeans were fighting against each other in the grimmest war imaginable, and yet now are embarked together on a great political and economic project. The peace of Europe, and the freedom I have to move around Europe, to work study or settle there, is simply wonderful.

Let us make it even better. Let us get rid of those pesky internal borders and immigration countrols and those huge foreign exchange costs that benefit nobody but the bankers. And let is get rid of our God-awful national governments.

224 thoughts on “Confessions of a Secret Europhile

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  • Chris Jones

    “the key question is whether a more powerful and democratic European government would be as prey to commercial interests and thus neo-con policies as national governments. I rather think it could not be worse”

    …it allready is – there has been no real sovereign national governments, in Europe at least, for many many years. It is the central banks who are calling the shots

  • John-Albert Eadie (@bothandeach)

    Craig I agree with you totally about the spot we are all in. I would agree also with your necessary solution, I love the EU idea and hope it will catch on .. but I’m a bit doubtful – I keep fantasizing that a grown-up alien race from outer space will have to come here and fix us up.

  • nuid

    “I keep fantasizing that a grown-up alien race from outer space will have to come here and fix us up.”

    To hell with that. They’re more likely to farm us for food – after we’ve given up trying to escape into the ‘wild’, so to speak.

  • Vronsky


    “It would not address the other problem – that of corruptibility of human nature in general.”

    True. It would be a jury, and juries can be nobbled. No jury would face greater nobbling resources than a demarchic government. I occasionally wonder about going a stage further and making policy at random. As we presently stand, policy is made by the corporate elite for their own short term comfort. It’s a systematic, monotone pursuit of catastrophe. Rolling a dice would give better results.

  • nuid

    “Do you know them well?”

    Don’t be silly-Billy,
    I was being flippant.

    However, I HAVE considered what it would be like if very powerful ETs landed here and considered us to be food, and our children a type of lamb or veal …

  • Kempe

    “I HAVE considered what it would be like if very powerful ETs landed here and considered us to be food, and our children a type of lamb or veal …”

    How do you know they’re not here already? Tens of thousands of people disappear (to alien abattoirs?) every year and it would explain the current epidemic of obesity (being fattened up for the kill).

  • Moniker

    On rather thinking it could not be worse: it would depend on getting confident, local systems into place first and the idea of ‘bottom up’ decision making firmly into practice, so that an over-arching administiative centre could not become a bureacratic (or any other kind of) dictator.

    I agree with 99.9 percent of the most unpopular post ever. My only concern is that the European Parliament, as it currently stands, is even less democratic and less accountable than the somewhat dodgy governments of the current European nation states, presumably because it’s bigger, more distant and so can get away with that much more assumption and obfustication.

    Nation states are definitely a big part of the problem though. They only exist because kings and suchlike invented them and they perpetuate the sort of outdated ideas that go with kings.

    Were we to have more active, smaller decision-making and administrative things-that-aren’t-nation-states, would we then need a Europe-sized anything? Wouldn’t we be looking for a more efficient and better- respected United Things-That-Arn’t-Nations organisation instead?

  • CD

    craig 28 Sep, 2012 – 10:57 pm

    Craig, if a person without resources cannot get to the centre of government to physically demonstrate their opposition to policies and laws while sectoral interests can get there by plane and be welcomed into the ante rooms of power, then revolution will become the only means to assert meaningful democracy.

  • evgueni


    “Rolling a dice would give better results.” – seems a little too radical. I think if Parliamentarians are aware that mickey-taking is punishable by Initiative / Referendum, they behave themselves much better from the outset. Being in Parliament then becomes just a job, discouraging the worst of the rent-seekers.

    I must admit I was thinking dice in another context on a different occasion. When it comes to making decisions in a democracy, MSM is key. With good quality information we make better informed choices, a clear advantage over choosing randomly. But if the MSM is biased, then it is not clear – depending on the extent of the bias, random uninformed choice may be less harmful than following the MSM lead..

  • Ben Franklin

    This thread had like 1300 comments and dropped two days of discussion in the process.


  • Petrus

    Ben Franklin: This thread had like 1300 comments and dropped two days of discussion in the process.




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