David Cameron Is Absolutely Right! 65


Cameron spoke the truth – Nigeria and Afghanistan are “fantastically corrupt.” They are indeed the “two most corrupt countries in the World”.

The bit he omitted was that both are so as a direct result of British military and imperial occupation of their country.

Of course when the Tories describe somewhere as “fantastically corrupt”, they mean “brilliant personal enrichment opportunity for me.” And not just the Tories. Tony Blair will be in there like a shot.


65 thoughts on “David Cameron Is Absolutely Right!

  • Chris Rogers

    CM,

    The hypocrisy of Cameron knows no lower bound, and as for Blair and his bloody wife I believe they dream US Dollars, most of which are covered in blood. With regards the little issue of imperialism/colonialism it really is a blot on the UK construct, as it was one of the main drivers fuelling the United Kingdom construct – just look at the Scots in Hong Kong, or Welsh regimental army brutality in Ireland after the Easter Uprising. Still Corbyn threatens all this, which is why he must go, less the greedy buggers lose their income streams or find themselves behind bars.

  • glenn

    Absolutely – he used the word “fantastically” very much in a positive sense, he was doubtless excited and being complementary about their regimes.

    • Chris Rogers

      How dare you throw anything at our City of London, it is, and always has been a paragon of virtue!

  • Jim gallacher

    When I worked in Nigeria they prided themselves on their British (English) values of justice. That is justice for the strong and corrupt and nothing for the weak, This country went from three crop growing seasons a year to famine year on year.

  • lysias

    Let me put in a plug for Chinua Achebe’s moving book There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra. It was scandalous how the Western powers, led by the UK, supported the central government of Nigeria against Biafra.

    • Habbabkuk (for accuracy and honesty when posting)

      I believe that France – also a Western power – supported Biafra.

  • Mark Russell

    It’s not a ‘summit’ – merely a ‘workshop’ from the undoubted masters of the trade. The politicians are simply touting what they do best. What’s the problem?

  • Geoff

    “And not just the Tories. Tony Blair will be in there like a shot.”…..

    Huh… for all this time I thought Tony was just a colourblind tory. I learn something new every day.

  • Habbabkuk (for accuracy and honesty when posting)

    Nigeria has been an independent country for over half a century.

    Lots of time, in other words, for it to develop its own particular, home-grown variety of corruption.

    To replace the corruption that didn’t exist when it was still a colony, so to speak.

    • bevin

      Colonialism is an institutionalised form of the most extreme corruption.
      The people were taxed in order to finance foreign oppressors, whose living standards were enormously higher than those of the conquered people. Their lands were stolen for plantations producing commodities for export. The slave trade hardly needs to be characterised as corrupt even for Tories. But if you need we can go over that too.
      The men were even conscripted into armies to fight in imperialist wars.
      It really beggars belief that people can still be seen crawling out of the woodwork in defence of imperialism.

    • Habbabkuk (flush out fakes)

      The UK’s support for the Federal Govt’s attempt to stop the break-up of Nigeria says absolutely nothing about the “British imperial government” – nada, zilch, bubkis.

      Except perhaps that Britain was still honorable enough to help the government of one of its largest former colonies twart the plans of a jumped-up little army colonel who one day decided he wanted a country all to himself, whatever the price in blood and treasure to the ordinary people of Biafra and indeed other Nigerians.

      • Mulga Mumblebrain

        And the destruction of Biafra caused a large massacre of innocents, like one of Israel’s regular pogroms against Gaza, multiplied one hundred-fold. I can see why you approve, flushed away.

    • lysias

      As Achebe recounts, the event that precipitated the secession of Biafra and the Nigerian Civil War was the 1966 anti-Igbo pogrom, in which, according to Wikipedia, “30,000-50,000 Igbo civilians were murdered throughout northern Nigeria by Hausa-Fulani soldiers and civilians”. Wikipedia goes on, “The 1966 massacres of southern Nigerians have been described as a holocaust by some authors[3] and have variously been described as riots, pogroms or genocide.[4]”

      Surely as least as much of a genocide as what happened in Bosnia.

      But our resident snitch seems only to be disturbed by certain genocides or mass murders, whichever they were.

      • Mulga Mumblebrain

        lysias, there was NO genocide in Bosnia. That is a NATO Big Lie, to justify the destruction of Yugoslavia and the demonisation of the Serbs. There was a nasty civil war, fomented by the West, with massacres by all sides, including the Bosnians, with help from al-Qaeda,flown in by the USA, including Bin Laden himself, then still a US ally.

        • lysias

          I mentioned Bosnia because our resident snitch has expressed strong support for the view that Bosnia occurred there. If what occurred in Bosnia was genocide, then it follows that what occurred in Nigeria must have been genocide. Which renders criticism directed at Col. Ojukwu most inappropriate.

      • Habbabkuk (flush out fakes)

        A death toll many times smaller than that occasioned by little Colonel Ojukwu’s determination to have a country all to himself and to keep on fighting to the last drop of his countrymens blood.

        Significant, perhaps, that he was only backed by the USSR and France – the usual suspects in Africa at the time. Little if any support from other African states and organisations.

        Case closed.

  • Martinned

    I’m having trouble believing that these countries were less corrupt before the British arrived. There may have been less money to go around back then, but that’s hardly the same as fewer people taking bribes.

    • Anon1

      Corruption is ingrained in the cultures of these countries. Much of it is not even considered corruption.

      The blog has descended into nothing more than a conduit for people who hate Britain.

      • Habbabkuk (flush out fakes)

        Correct on both statements, Anon1.

        Speaking generally, the African has a great (and admirable) sense of family, tribe and (less admirably) elite but little sense of duty or obligation to the nation. Which is to a large extent understandable given the leadership of those countries.

        Strangely enough, a little like the Greeks.

        • Clark

          “The African”? Which African do you mean, Habbabkuk? Surely you don’t mean “Africans”?

          Africans are like this (if they deserve a plural at all), Greeks are like that, the Serbs “got what was coming to them”… You don’t see people, do you? You see members of races. Astonishing. Hurry up and die; you’re impeding social development.

      • RobG

        Anon1 said: “The blog has descended into nothing more than a conduit for people who hate Britain.”

        I don’t hate Britain. I do hate the the utter vermin who have dragged my country into the gutter.

        The ongoing cover-up of the Westminster child sex abuse scandal, all aided and abetted by the Presstitutes, is a prime example of this; although ‘Kitty’ might be facing charges sometime soon…

        http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/may/10/police-hand-cliff-richard-sexual-abuse-claims-to-prosecutors-sources-say

        He’s probably Habba’s favourite popular entertainer after Jimmy Savile.

      • Republicofscotland

        Anon1.

        On the contrary, most people in here will know of France’s exploitation of French North Africa, or Italy’s reign in Libya, or Belgium’s bloody rule in the Congo.

        Little did, Daniel Haughton and Mungo Park realise that, their expeditions to the Dark continent in the late 17th century, would lead to half of Europe, Russia, and later on the USA, to exploit, asset strip and enslave Africa, and its people for the best part of 200 years.

        I find it mildly amusing your attempts to defend British actions in Africa.

      • Republicofscotland

        Anon1.

        Yes that’s true, but we showed them how to do it on a much grander scale. Whilst they were busy ripping off each other we (Europe/Russia/lcater USA) upped our game and ripped off the whole bloody continent.

        Royalty not wishing to be left out sent in modern day Henry Morgan’s, in the mould of the legendary buccaneer, in the shape of Tiny Rowland.

    • Habbabkuk (flush out fakes)

      It is difficult to know how much bribery and corruption there was in Africa before the British arrived but it can be said without the slightest difficulty that bribery and corruption in the British colonies* were as nothing when compared with what happened after independence.
      _______________

      * If they existed at all.

      • Chris Rogers

        I concur, basically after the British left there was actually more money to bribe themselves with, given the UK’s slice was left in the pot. I won’t even mention arms sales, but know one person, convicted, who’s happy to blow the whistle, although he’s an experienced Asia hand, rather than your African variety – the Yanks don’t like him because strangely enough, he was a Yank selling Yank arms.

      • Anon1

        Post-colonial studies, innit. Everything is all the fault of the white for evermore.

        • Chris Rogers

          Yes, something to do with interfering busy bodies raping and pillaging and then claiming its good for the natives, who mostly were getting along fine with their lives until the White face came along and fucked it all up – just go ask the Chinese.

    • bevin

      Of course you are having trouble. Try thinking.
      Nigeria did not exist before the British, thinking ahead, cobbled several disparate elements together with a view to dividing for more economical conquest.
      Books have been written on the subject, but I suggest that you start with some elementary anthropological studies.

      As to Afghanistan, its history conforms slightly more closely to the western model of a state.

      In both cases however the role that Britain played- in Nigeria to kidnap labourers and to seize raw materials; in Afghanistan, basically to maintain control over the sub continent and create a barrier in central Asia against Russia expansion- remains a major cause of the current problems these countries face. As Trowbridge points out, the USA must bear a major portion of the guilt for its malicious interference in the past sixty odd years. (But a moment, habbathought, in the history of humanity).

      Please don’t misinterpret my impatient tone: there is no reason why you should not know these very basic facts. And many more which would allow you to reach sensible conclusions.

    • bevin

      Of course you are having trouble. Try thinking.
      Nigeria did not exist before the British, thinking ahead, cobbled several disparate elements together with a view to dividing for more economical conquest.
      Books have been written on the subject, but I suggest that you start with some elementary anthropological studies.

      As to Afghanistan, its history conforms slightly more closely to the western model of a state.

      In both cases however the role that Britain played- in Nigeria to kidnap labourers and to seize raw materials; in Afghanistan, basically to maintain control over the sub continent and create a barrier in central Asia against Russia expansion- remains a major cause of the current problems these countries face. As Trowbridge points out, the USA must bear a major portion of the guilt for its malicious interference in the past sixty odd years. (But a moment, habbathought, in the history of humanity).

      Please don’t misinterpret my impatient tone: there is no reason why you should not know these very basic facts. And many more which would allow you to reach sensible conclusions.

      • Trowbridge H. Ford aka The Biscuit

        And just think, Bevin, if the loony CIA had just been willing to catch the 19 alleged hijackers, and handed them over to the Taliban in exchange for Osama bin Ladin, we would have been spared the last 15 years of misery at the hands of more Whites.

  • eddie-g

    To be a tiny bit fair to Nigeria… they aren’t the most corrupt nation in the world. 136/167 isn’t a record to be proud of, but there are worse countries than them!

    Like Iraq and Libya. Fancy that.

  • Ba'al Zevul

    Tony’s in Rwanda right now. At the World Economic Forum Africa, hosted by Kagame. On the way there he visited Egypt, Ethiopia and Kenya, all of which make similar pious noises about corruption in order to qualify for World Bank money. His Africa Governance Initiative is well-established in Nigeria, too.

    However, the definition of corruption can be flexible. It might be believed that it includes rewarding party donors with positions in the upper chamber, where, unelected, they can influence government. But that would be absurd, because we do it.

    • Ba'al Zevul

      Sorry, sorry. Meant to add that Blair has conducted the entire trip thus far on board a private jet belonging to Naguib Sawiris, second richest man in Egypt, and extremely close to Sisi. No corruption there, then. No possible room for undue infkluence.
      No more Blair from me on this thread, I promise…

      • Chris Rogers

        Ba’al Zevul,

        How dare you cast such spurious aspersions on our glorious former leader. Here is a man who speaks with God and duty what God instructs, like indulging in greed, contributing to the deaths of more than 2 million in the ME alone, whilst bring lasting peace to Israel, via chemical and biological weapons to be used no doubt on the actual natives. God Bless her Maj and God Bless Blair. He needs it as a hang mans loose is waiting for him sometime in the future, that or damnation.

    • Mulga Mumblebrain

      Kagame is a gigantic genocidaire, really fit company for Blair, the narcissist.

  • Ba'al Zevul

    Synchronicity:
    Radio 4 is at this moment broadcasting an item on the unfolding Unaoil saga. Corruption, meet Rolls-Royce and others…

  • Mr Oladapo Habeeb

    Further to Cameron unguided comments, I am equally disappointed and embarrassed but not shocked. What we witnessed was typical western hypocrisy. It shows the insincerity of the UK government in our fight against corruption. The irony is that the western governments benefits from corruptions. I believe, Nigeria government should look for sincere partnership with other countries like China or Russia. We deserve respect and positive comments in our war against corruption. Down with them that disrespect Nigeria.

    • Habbabkuk (flush out fakes)

      . “I believe, Nigeria government should look for sincere partnership with other countries like China or Russia.”
      _______________________

      That was funny. Thanks!

      • nevermind

        Nothing funny about that my little bridge dweller, Nigeria is a free country that can deal with whoever promises them the most for their diminishing oil reserves. Whatever makes you think that China could not afford to give African nations a better deal for access to resources, you little imperialist leftover.

        Corruption is everywhere, it has many names, bribes, incentives, enabling, society is riddled with it, from back handers to discussing quotes with so called rival companies. The worst of corruption is happening in the arms and drugs trade. To say that the |City of London’s two ton cocaine habit/per annum can thrive without the law knowing about it, would be ignorant and naive.

    • Ba'al Zevul

      The context for Cameron’s remarks is this:

      http://voiceofnigeria.org.ng/london-2016-a-recognition-of-president-buharis-anti-corruption-focus/

      Undoubtedly, Buhari is making the right noises, which go rather beyond the kind of measures Cameron is prepared to countenance for his City chums. Interestingly, and accurately, he blames creeping globalisation for hindering everyone’s efforts to control corruption. On the other hand, the cynic (and I am a cynic, Mr Habeeb, sorry) might say that taking steps to conform with global norms on corruption will cost a lot of money, and that not all this money will go on that activity. While the political opposition’s corruption is exposed in full, things might go on in the traditional way as far as the ruling party is concerned. I hope I am wrong.

  • fwl

    Anyone remember that Wikileak story of the conversation between an American diplomat and oil co Brit in Nigeria. It was a classic.

  • Aidworker1

    When I worked in Nigeria what made me despair was that no-one seemed to care about the endemic corruption.

    I was in a hospital and there was no passion at all about anything – dirt everywhere and with no money you had no treatment.

    Poor me – but I also work in Afghanistan where the corruption is less visible.

    What Cameron said is absolutely right – did he say this to raise the profile of his summit?

  • Chris

    Does nobody else think this is just a PR stunt by Cameron & co? They obviously knew they were being filmed and surely recorded too. We just had a mass of data released by the ICIJ and the Canadian officials are going through the full database of panama papers with a fine tooth comb, pursuing criminal convictions.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/panama-papers-canada-revenue-agency-investigation-1.3574468

    On the ICIJ website it lists UK as the 5th top country with companies linked to Mossack Fonseca

    “Top Countries
    Browse the countries with most names of people or companies.
    British Virgin Islands
    Hong Kong
    Switzerland
    China
    United Kingdom”

    But instead of our government going through the files, which John Doe seems to be willing to hand to authorities, we are just standing around talking about Nigeria and Afghanistan…. Is that really the biggest piece of news on corruption right now in the UK? The panama papers aren’t even in the 10 most read news items on the BBC.

  • WHS

    Right. Foreigners lack moral agency because of the British Empire, which collapsed 50 years ago. Great racism of low expectations there.

  • Doug Scorgie

    Habbabkuk (flush out fakes) May 11, 2016 at 08:10

    “A death toll many times smaller than that occasioned by little Colonel Ojukwu’s determination to have a country all to himself and to keep on fighting to the last drop of his countrymens blood.

    “Significant, perhaps, that he was only backed by the USSR and France – the usual suspects in Africa at the time. Little if any support from other African states and organisations.”
    ………………………………………………………………………..
    I think you will find, Habbabkuk, that Israel also backed the Colonel’s side.

    Also:
    The British planned to maintain and expand their supply of cheap high-quality oil from Nigeria. Therefore they placed a high priority on maintenance of oil extraction and refining operations. They backed the Federal Government, but when the war broke out cautioned them not to damage British oil installations in the East.

    These oilworks, under the control of Shell-BP Petroleum Development Company (jointly owned by Shell and British Petroleum), controlled 84% of Nigeria’s 580,000 barrels per day. Two-thirds of this oil came from the Eastern region, and another third from the newly created Mid-West region. Two-fifths of all Nigerian oil ended up in Britain.
    (Wikipedia)

  • Roderick Russell

    If our politicos know that some developing countries are ““fantastically corrupt.” why do we keep sending them aid money? Do the politicos in the donor countries not have a responsibility to ensure that the aid money is honestly spent? What could logically induce them to send funds to 3rd world countries that they believe will be stolen?

    Money is power and if one funds corrupt politicos in the developing world, then one gives them a huge advantage over their more honest rivals – which helps to ensure the continuance of bad government in some developing countries. Is this foreign aid, or foreign disservice?

    We have a responsibility to ensure that our money is honestly spent. Has anybody ever done a study on what proportion of our aid money is stolen in the recipient countries, and what proportion of that is then kicked back to individuals in the donor countries?

  • James

    Utter nonsense. I don’t recall Nigeria playing much part in the banking crisis. Or Afghanistan invading and bombing the shit out of a country half way round the world based on pure lies.

  • Johnstone

    Weren’t Cameron’s comments meant to be heard? WHY
    The vast majority of refugees in this town are from Afghanistan and they are not economic migrants. One little boy demonstrated to me what happened to some family members. It sounded like an imaginary machine gun to me. One has to wonder whether an imperialists pact placed this country in the role of providing asylum to the migrants from Afghanistan while others or proxy others tear it apart. Instead of the ‘war against terror’ substitute imperialist invasion..If it wasn’t NATO sure it would be Russia

  • John Spencer-Davis

    Transparency International UK is none too impressed with David Cameron’s anti-corruption summit, citing “overseas bribery by UK companies, the laundering of corrupt assets through the City, dirty money entering the UK’s property market through secretive offshore safe havens, such as British overseas territories, as well as numerous political corruption scandals at home” as considerable evidence that the UK needs to get its own house in order before it has the credibility to lecture other countries.

    http://www.transparency.org.uk/press-releases/international-anti-corruption-summit-media-briefing-paper/

    • Ba'al Zevul

      That’s global corruption wealth generation, JS-D Entirely different because…er…because…it’s…um…bigger?

      • John Spencer-Davis

        I find it remarkable that money can be laundered in this way. How the hell do they get away with it? You can be jailed for abetting laundering. Why have not more people been jailed? It’s ridiculous.

    • fred

      Yes the UK government has long been complicit in the bribery of foreign officials by British firms. In 2009 Reading-based Mabey and Johnson were convicted of handing out bribes totalling £470,000 to politicians and officials in Ghana.

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