Reply To: SARS cov2 and Covid 19


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#64270
SA

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What you state is not true. The following are extracts from the MHRA website on the phase 3 trial

“In Study 2, approximately 44,000 participants 12 years of age and older were randomised equally and received 2 doses of COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine or placebo with a planned interval of 21 days. The efficacy analyses included participants that received their second vaccination within 19 to 42 days after their first vaccination. Participants are planned to be followed for up to 24 months, for assessments of safety and efficacy against COVID-19 disease.”

Efficacy against COVID-19 disease
At the time of the analysis of Study 2, information presented is based on participants 16 years and older. Participants had been followed for symptomatic COVID-19 disease for at least 2,214 person-years for the COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine and at least 2,222 person-years in the placebo group. There were 8 confirmed COVID-19 cases identified in the COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine group and 162 cases in the placebo group, respectively. In this analysis, compared to placebo, efficacy of COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine BNT162b2 from first COVID-19 occurrence from 7 days after Dose 2 in participants without evidence of prior infection with SARS-CoV-2 was 95.0% (95% credible interval of 90.3% to 97.6%). In participants 65 years of age and older and 75 years of age and older without evidence of prior infections with SARS-CoV-2, efficacy of COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine BNT162b2 was 94.7% (two-sided 95% confidence interval of 66.7% to 99.9%) and 100% (two-sided 95% confidence interval of -13.1% to 100.0%) respectively.

In a separate analysis, compared to placebo, efficacy of COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine from first COVID-19 occurrence from 7 days after Dose 2 in participants with or without evidence of prior infection with SARS-CoV-2 was 94.6% (95% credible interval of 89.9% to 97.3%).”

So I am not sure what you are on about.
My main criticism of the rushing through of the vaccines is that long term efficacy and side effects could not be assessed in such a short period of time. But that has to be weighed against the speed with which the disease is progressing, and the failure of the control mechanisms put in place. At the end of the day, if you believe the virus causes trivial infection, then you would agree that the vaccine has been rushed through, but given that this virus is advancing rapidly, and with many unknowns, and given that already about two million have died of the disease in one year, about a tenth of that of Spanish ‘flu, then I think using the vaccine is reasonable.