Sickening Labour 66


You expect the Tories to be stupid. It is their nature, as John Stuart Mill pointed out. But the disruption by New Labour of radical reform of the House of Lords is about career advantage and a total absence of genuine political belief. Which is precisely what Blair brought to New Labour. Tomorrow he makes his Labour Party comeback speech at Highbury – to a closed £120 a ticket dinner. Says it all, really.


66 thoughts on “Sickening Labour

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  • Mary

    Last night’s fundraiser? with the execrable Ms Jewell was cancelled as they had gone to ground, knowing that the game was up. One of these days someone will succeed in getting their hands round his throat.
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    http://stopwar.org.uk/index.php/action-a-events/national-events/1659-july-9-protest-when-war-criminal-tony-blair-speaks-in-london
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    The STWC alert sent Monday said that Ed Miliband was going to be at this dinner with the prime psychopath and war criminal. Shame on him. Nobody can have any faith in any of the political parties or leaders as was said on the previous post.
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    ‘BLAIR DUE TO SPEAK WITH ED MILLIBAND: THIS WEDNESDAY, 11TH JULY
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    The Lambeth event is only one in a series that Blair is speaking at this month. On Wednesday 11th July he will join a dinner with Ed Milliband to promote British sport in the run up to the Olympics.’
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    I am wondering whether the dinner has anything to do with Beyond Sport, an association of international sporting bodies and commercial brands set up one Nick Keller. Bliar is chairman of its ‘Ambassadors’. Bottom feeders, this time on sport. See the ubiquitous Tutu there and Obomber’s half sister. And Coe of course.
    {http://www.beyondsport.org/behind-beyond/people/?type=ambassadors}

  • Tom Welsh

    You don’t expect people like John Stuart Mill to indulge in crude personal abuse. But perhaps that is their nature. As one of that fast vanishing breed – a small-“c” conservative – I simultaneously resent and understand his remark. What is certainly true is that it is much easier to look clever when you criticize the whole structure of society, and propose elaborate new ways in which everything could be done very much better. The person who appreciates the arguments of, say, Edmund Burke is quite likely to look stupid in comparison to “reforming” firebrands. The reluctance to go off half-cocked – the profound belief that if something isn’t broken you shouldn’t attempt to fix it – can come across as a plain lack of ideas. But it ain’t necessarily so.
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    The British constitution grew “organically”, as the result of a series of relatively small changes each triggered by the overwhelming force of events. Strange as it may sound, almost everything is there for a reason. And it does work, after a fashion. Arguably, it works about as well as such an arrangement can work. As is so often the case, a proposition that appears “obvious” to clever people turns out, in sad retrospect, to have been utterly wrong. Remember how the market could be trusted to set correct interest rates and prices? Or the mathematician who proved that bumblebees can’t fly?
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    So why do we suddenly need to change the House of Lords into a second elected chamber? It lacks “legitimacy”, we are told. But how legitimate is the House of Commons, come to that? Its members are all elected, to be sure; but how much much would you trust any of them? They are all in it for themselves, it seems; and their constituents don’t have much influence once they are MPs.
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    The House of Lords has historically done a good job as a revising chamber, partly because most of its members were not professional politicians, and so had time and energy to acquire expertise useful knowledge. Also, of course, because they were relatively independent of political influence. Getting rid of the House of Lords seems to me as sensible as removing the keel of a ship in a moderately heavy storm, and replacing it with an extra couple of funnels. Don’t be too surprised if it capsizes!

  • Komodo

    Re. Lords’ reform – I don’t think the proposed reforms will enhance democracy significantly, and although Labour are opposing it for all the wrong reasons, they are actually right to do so.
    A partially elected chamber? What kind of a dog’s breakfast is that? Party politics guaranteed to swallow any vestige of independence, and a few “experts” who will undoubtedly be appointed from the trough-swillers’ alliance? This hasn’t been thought through. A reform of the Commons would be more appropriate, in any case. As in “In the name of God, go.”
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    Re. Blair – if that grinning, swivel-eyed, psychotic oxygen thief gets anywhere near the levers of power again, I am leaving the country and getting as far away from the comedian as I can. I am already looking for dragon positions in Chile.
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    Yup, says it all about Labour. Says it all about the greedy, fraudulent, shallow, bogus (etc, etc) Blair.

  • Komodo

    And what Tom Welsh said, too. Though the independence of the Lords has been sadly compromised by party patronage of late.

  • nevermind

    40% of those in the House of Lords who voted/waved the NHS bill through, had vested intereasts in a yes vote. That alone shows that the House of Lords are asa tarnished with corrupt practises as the Commons.
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    If we want to get rid of celebrity politics, were even war criminals have a chance to get re-elected, a new swear word btw., then we have to stop people being re elected, stop the ability of lobbyists to monger, stop with this obsession of seeing an alternative to vote for in whoever is in opposition.
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    If corruption matters to us, something that could be argued as being somewaht down voters agenda, then we would choose all reps. at random. It would rejuvenate the civil service into thinking once again, rather than pandering to the foibles of those they know so well, those who always been there, our bent career politicians.

    Lets disperse with voting, the argument that democracy comes from one man one vote, is turgid and lame when 70% can’t be bothered. i rather pregfer a randomly selected democracy, one that chooses new reps every four years, no need for liars and party politics.

    This would also change the BBC, dramatically, another turgid institution with interests in the status quo.

    Emoticon for spitting anyone?

  • John Goss

    I’m disillusioned with politics since my views don’t get represented by elected politicians never mind appointed ones.

  • Abe Rene

    You’re absolutely right Craig, £120 a head is disgusting. Do they think they deserve the best BS that money can buy with that much? I’d never do it. Some of us have Standards to keep up. ONE THOUSAND per head and not a penny less! Think I’m cheap or what?

  • Abe Rene

    PS. Jokes aside, I actually we should not make BS speeches but support Truth and Justice, though maybe not always the American Way.

  • guest

    The House of Lords is were members of the House of Commons go when they retire. The House of Lords brings them and their selected friends and paymasters titles and gongs, an extremely useful tool when seeking to impress the weak minded. The House of Lords is seen by members of the House of Commons as a very big pension pot, where they can use their many years of finely honed criminality to further their only aim in life, themselves.
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    Members of the House of Commons/Lords and their selected friends and paymasters will do anything to preserve that system. What else could/would you expect from a parsitical life form!.

  • TFS

    So let me get this straight.

    the libdems will change their minds on another vote if they don’t get their way on this one?

    cool, lets show those other nations how Democracy works shall we? and sush don’t mention the whips.

  • Komodo

    Oh – and….good point from a Tory in your link, Mary –
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    However, for all his enthusiasm to re-engage in British politics, there was one invitation Mr Blair was happy to turn down.

    MPs on the Commons Justice Select Committee asked him to give evidence on the operation of the Freedom of Information Act. He was an obvious witness to summon as he described the Act as one of the biggest mistakes of his time in office.

    The MPs asked him to appear in person. When he turned down the invitation, they asked him to submit written evidence, but he failed to do so.

    One member, the Tory MP Elizabeth Truss, said: “He ought to have turned up. Given he was able to give an interview on the Rolling Stones over the same period, you would have thought he would have been able to give evidence on his role in government.”

  • Mary

    Stop the War Coalition
    Bulletin 10 July 2012
    Email: office at stopwar.org.uk
    Tel: 0207 561 9311
    http://www.stopwar.org.uk
    Facebook: facebook.com/stopthewarcoalition
    Twitter: twitter.com/STWuk
    .
    Give Tony Blair the boot: Protest 11 July
    The attempt to rehabilitate Tony Blair’s public image continues unabated. After editing the Evening Standard he will now be appearing on Wednesday 11 July alongside Ed Milliband at a dinner to promote British sport at the Arsenal Emirates Football Stadium. Help give him the welcome he deserves: War Criminals are not welcome here… or anywhere except at the International Criminal Court facing charges for war crimes. Please help spread the word in every way you can. And sign the TONY BLAIR NOT WELCOME HERE e-petition: bit.ly/MXrS33
    .
    War Criminals Not Welcome Here
    Protest Wednesday 11 July 5.30pm
    Main Entrance: Arsenal Emirates Stadium
    London N5 1BU
    Nearest tube Holloway, Arsenal or Finsbury Park.
    How to get there: bit.ly/MXjWyK
    Facebook event: on.fb.me/MXk0yB
    For details and updates: bit.ly/MXnrFE
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    * E-PETITION: Make sure you sign the TONY BLAIR NOT WELCOME HERE e-petition:
    bit.ly/MXrS33
    * SEE Lindsey German: Why war criminal Tony Blair’s comeback plan must be stopped in its tracks:
    bit.ly/Ng4RqT
    * SEE: Nowhere safe for Tony Blair as yet another attempt to arrest him for war crimes:
    bit.ly/LoamA8

  • Tom Welsh

    I should have added that the House of Lords has already been seriously degraded by the removal of hereditary peers and their replacement by superannuated party hacks, who – like MPs – are nothing more than extensions of the PM’s will. Since New Labour started to muck about with it (or even before) I felt that its name should be changed to “House of Cronies” and its members known as Cronies rather than Lords and Ladies. We can all think of cases in point.

    There is no earthly point in having more than one elected house, other than to help the politicians muddy the waters still more. The USA has the Senate because there was concern that the various states would lose their influence. But Senators are nominated by their states, not elected by the whole citizen body of the USA.

    The nice thing about the old House of Lords, mostly made up of strange eccentric peers,was precisely that it had nothing in common with democracy or elections. It was just a bunch of people, many of them sharing a tradition of public service, and quite a lot of them with a surprising amount of expertise in a whole lot of practical fields. The whole point was that they didn’t have to worry about re-election, they weren’t beholden to anyone, and many of them were independently wealthy so they couldn’t easily be bribed. Of course it wasn’t perfect, but nothing is – least of all in politics.

  • Komodo

    I date the rot to Thatcher, but it goes back before that, obviously. How well I remember the wholly ineffectual late John J Mackay – whose experience of the real world was considerably more than Cameron’s, Osborne’s and Hague’s combined, as he had taught maths at Oban High before joining the council gravy train – who served one term as Argyll’s MP and was rightly booted. Upstairs as a Lord. I never did work out what Thatcher thought was worth keeping in play, there.

  • Mary

    This one I think.
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2001/feb/22/guardianobituaries.obituaries
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    Irreverent, he even dared make fun of the hereditary backwoodsmen who came out of the woodwork to make up Tory majorities in the Lords. In November 1998 he said: “There are some people here I have never seen before and (was) wondering who they were.” According to Viscount Thurso, his witty debating style was “rather like a well executed Scottish reel. There is lots of style, much movement, lots of euching and at the end you find that you are back where you started!”

    !!
    Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose etc etc.

  • guest

    “I date the rot to Thatcher, but it goes back before that, obviously.”
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    Komodo
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    You are correct, Its been traced back to Denis Healey, he was another like Blair that changed after a visit to the USA. Some say it goes back to Hugh Gaitskell, I think it was Denis Healey that was the bad seed…All academic.

  • DonnyDarko

    What was it Cameron said ?
    We’re all in it !! Together.
    All the main parties worship the money of the City.It’s they that decide policy, and the voter is a necessary prop.
    The Lords makes the farce complete.It’s just the last carriage of the gravy train.
    Could NATO not bomb some democracy into Westminster and WHitehall before Syria ?
    Britain could use a little.

  • Mary

    27 Remploy factories are to be scrapped. Only 7 will stay open. This means that thousands of disabled people are put on the scrapheap. They will never find other jobs especially not at the present time.
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    Iain Duncan Smith sits emotionless alongside the self satisfied but rather discomforted Maria Millar who announced the closures. Outrage on both sides of the ‘House’. She keeps sympathising. Empty words.
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    ‘Maria Millar Remploy Killer’ is the epithet being bandied about and even given voice to in the form of Iraqi war supporter Ann Clywd.

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