More Establishment Hypocrisy 214


Those suddenly concerned about the European Arrest Warrant in Westminster last night were notably silent when it was used against Julian Assange, with a case that had more holes in it than a condom torn by Anna Ardin, the noted CIA agent.

Not only was the evidence against Assange not tested, the Supreme Court accepted that a Swedish prosecutor with a screaming political agenda was a “judicial authority”, despite her being neither a judge nor a court. That extraordinary ruling was itself dependent on two even more extraordinary false premises, directly stated in Lord Phillip’s judgement.

1) That the French term “autorites judiciaires” has a “wider meaning” than the English term “judicial authorities”. That is simply untrue.

2) That the French language version of the treaty is “authentic and original” and to be preferred to the English version. That is absolutely untrue – the different language versions are explicitly equal. That is a fundamental rule of EU (and UN)treaties, both of which I have personal experience of negotiating.

The bottom line being, if the Establishment wants to get you, it will, irrespective of the letter of the law.


214 thoughts on “More Establishment Hypocrisy

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  • Mary

    Mr Garcia has stepped up to the mark for FIFA corruption, Blatter and Qatar.

    World Cup inquiry clears Qatar but criticises English FA
    The English Football Association has been accused of flouting bidding rules in its attempt to stage the 2018 World Cup – but 2022 hosts Qatar have been cleared of corruption allegations.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/30031405

  • OldMark

    Political executions under Castro – per the respected historian Hugh Thomas – around 5000

    Classic bit of gilding the lily there from RD.

    HRW is not known for showing leniency to dictatorial states that are also strongly anti American, but even they note that this figure from Hugh Thomas is a guesstimate. They also clarify that this figure refers to the period 1959-70, and that there have been improvements on human rights issues in the country in more recent years, noting ‘encouraging steps’ particularly in relation to abuses in the prison system-

    http://www.hrw.org/reports/1999/cuba/Cuba996-11.htm

  • Ba'al Zevul

    PS In this country, we write £1.1billion NOT £1,1 billion.

    If I deduce correctly what brought that on, it’s its Belgian typewriter again….

  • ------------·´`·.¸¸.¸¸.··.¸¸Node

    Rosetta briefing summary

    Philae (the lander) hit the target landing area with amazing accuracy. [Think about it : after the incredible billiards shot that brought Rosetta to the comet, it then had to manoeuvre for a darts shot, achieve exactly the right relative motion so that Philae, when released, would freefall for 22km to hit the centre of the bulls eye. Hats off to flights dynamics dept].

    Philae touched down at 1 m/s, sank in about 4 cm, then when the anchors failed to work, bounced off again at 0.37 m/s, tumbled for nearly 2 hours before ‘landing’ again about 1 km away from original site, then a final short (7 min) bounce before coming to rest. Philae is at an angle to the surface, but seems to be approximately the right way up and relatively undamaged. The scanners and cameras are working – a close up of a half-covered boulder shows that there is loose dust on the surface, an important discovery. Radio contact is working as it should. Could have been a lot worse.

    The two main problems (so far) are:
    (1) Philae is unanchored therefore they dare not use any of the onboard mechanical instruments for fear of disturbing its position or even causing it to leave the surface again. Plenty passive scanning is possible, however.
    (2) It’s settled in a position which provides only about 1/4 of the sunlight for the solar panels that they planned for. This will affect the power available for experiments, particularly if Philae continues to function after its 2 batteries are exhausted. [It was hoped that Philae would continue monitoring the comet as it looped round the sun].

    Speculation: I wonder if, after doing all the ‘safe’ experimentation that is possible, they then try rotating the sample drill, or even firing the harpoons, to try and settle again in a better position.

  • Ba'al Zevul

    According to one headline today, composed by a journalist intern wazzed out of his/her box on marching powder, Tony Blair is ‘fighting Ebola’ as he jets between Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea in the course of two days. While there is plenty of management bollocks in the current AGI job offer section, there’s nothing about burying corpses. Just management.

    I’m not alone in thinking AGI is a scam. Clearly reasoned rundown by a DPhil student on the topic of loans to Africa and their destination. AGI is specifically mentioned:

    http://politicsinspires.org/will-tony-blair%E2%80%99s-africa-governance-initiative%E2%80%99s-focus-on-large-scale-economic-investment-lead-to-further-underdevelopment-in-africa/

  • doug scorgie

    Resident Dissident
    12 Nov, 2014 – 11:01 pm

    “…per the respected historian Hugh Thomas…”
    ……………

    That would be the English establishment historian Baron Thomas of Swynnerton, ex of the Foreign Office.

    He was Chairman of the Centre for Policy Studies in London from 1979 to 1991, which worked for Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

    His book: “Cuba or the Pursuit of Freedom” was written 34 years ago and he was talking about executions up to 1970 not since.

    “Historian Hugh Thomas, who acknowledged the impossibility of knowing precisely how many executions and other human rights violations had occurred, estimated that by early 1961, the Cuban government had “probably” executed some 2,000 Cubans, while by 1970, the government had, “perhaps,” executed 5,000.

    Thomas does not specify whether these executions occurred following trials…”

    http://www.hrw.org/reports/1999/cuba/Cuba996-11.htm

    Executions undoubtedly took place after the 1959 revolution and perhaps up to 1970 as the historian claims.

    But the fact is we don’t know and Hugh Thomas “…acknowledged the impossibility of knowing precisely how many executions [took place]…”

    He also does not specify whether these executions occurred following trial or what crimes these Cubans were executed for; murder and treason being capital crimes.

    He doesn’t even know whether the executions were of political prisoners or not.

    He uses the words “probably” and “perhaps”.

    The last executions in Cuba were in 2003. There are no people in Cuba currently under sentence of death.

    Since 2003 the USA has executed 539 people and has 3,035 on death row.

    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/executions-year

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    Mr Scorgie

    OK, look, you’ve been a goof boy lately, so here’s the deal.

    The Castro régime never executed anyone and Hugh Thomas made it all up.

    How’s that?

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    That should have been “good boy”, but “goof” wasn’t that far out either, I suppose.

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    By the way, Mr Scorgie, your piece on Cuba gives me the impression that you are not against capital punishment. Or perhaps you are not against capital punishment when carried out by certain régimes.

    Please assure us that this is not so.

  • doug scorgie

    Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)
    13 Nov, 2014 – 8:25 pm

    “Mr Scorgie”
    “OK, look, you’ve been a goof boy lately, so here’s the deal.”

    “The Castro régime never executed anyone and Hugh Thomas made it all up.”

    “How’s that?”
    ……………

    That reply to my post was rather juvenile for you Habbabkuk. You obviously read what I wrote and couldn’t counter any of the points I made, so you came up with the above feeble nonsense.

    You should have let ResDis reply as I was addressing him. Even he could have come up with something better.

    Readers of this blog will see what a low-intellect tosser you are.

  • doug scorgie

    Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)
    13 Nov, 2014 – 8:29 pm

    “By the way, Mr Scorgie, your piece on Cuba gives me the impression that you are not against capital punishment.”
    ……………

    If my piece on Cuba gave you that impression Habbabkuk you need your brain re-wired.

    But to put your mind at rest: I am against capital punishment wherever it is carried out.

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    Mr Scorgie

    “But to put your mind at rest: I am against capital punishment wherever it is carried out.”
    _______________

    An even-handed reply at last! You are making progress, Doug.

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    Mr Scorgie

    “That reply to my post was rather juvenile for you Habbabkuk. You obviously read what I wrote and couldn’t counter any of the points I made”
    _________________

    Hardly, Doug.

    Hugh Thomas was estimating and offering no guarantee for his figures, and you took several lines to tell us that his figures were estimates and therefore without guarantee.

    Were there any other “points” than that in your longish post?

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    NB Hugh Thomas, writer of the standard history of the Spanish civil war. A distinguished historian.

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    Mr Scorgie

    “He also does not specify whether these executions occurred following trial or what crimes these Cubans were executed for; murder and treason being capital crimes.”
    ______________

    That, Doug, might give the normal reader the impression that executions are OK if they occur after a trial and/or if they were for murder or treason.

    I of course accept your assurance that you are against capital punishment but it might be wise if you drafted your screeds rather more carefully lest you lead the normal reader astray.

  • Ba'al Zevul

    Earlier this month, the delightful Tony Blair was paying a courtesy call on General Prayut Chan-o-cha, who helped himself to the premiership of Thailand in May, and issued an interim constitution granting himself amnesty for leading the coup and investing himself with vast powers (Wiki). I mentioned the visit at the time – Tony was enchanting Vietnam with a courtesy call shortly afterwards, too. But, sadly, the omnipresent Tony – he talks to God, you know – is not without his critics, even in Thailand.

    https://thaipoliticalprisoners.wordpress.com/tag/prayuth-chan-ocha/

    So unfair. The country’s human rights record at least equals Morsi’s Egypt (coup explicitly supported by Blair). And autocratic dictators understand the details of cash transfers from philanthropic donors to private bank accounts almost without being told.

    They don’t actually say why he was there and who was paying for him….

    You are, possums. You.

  • nevermind

    Ba’al, do youn think Blair has received a message from the devil to become the worlds first ever president? because he’s more in the air than on the ground.

    I think he’s got a secret boyfriend and is keeping away from Cherie as much as possible, doing a bit of business on the side….;)

  • Ba'al Zevul

    …is keeping away from Cherie as much as possible…

    Wouldn’t want to be accused of facism*, but wouldn’t you? 🙂

    * as in ‘face’

  • John Spencer-Davis

    Just to show that I am not too proud to consider and publicise opinions conflicting with my own…

    This is a bit off topic (sorry!) but Julian Assange does receive considerable mention within the second part of this Media Lens analysis of Russell Brand’s new book “Revolution”.

    http://www.medialens.org/index.php/alerts/alert-archive/2014.html

    Top two Media Alerts apply.

    People may remember that I’m no fan of Brand, but I have enormous respect for David Cromwell and David Edwards and clearly they have a lot of time for him. Also, they clearly regard media commentators who don’t like Brand as a lot of toffee-nosed elitist snobs, and I am sorry to say that they seem to make a very good case. I feel myself to be in poor company! Or perhaps I am a toffee-nosed elitist snob myself.

    Having said that, I’ve just read the first few paragraphs of “Revolution” on Amazon, and I have no inclination to read further, I am afraid. He just makes me shudder and feel sick. Doubtless that says more about me than about him, I realise that. Anyway, I am just signposting this to you all as a resource. Since it’s off topic I won’t respond to comments. Take care, and enjoy.

    Kind regards,

    John

  • Mary

    Why did Cameron announce his intention to introduce new terrrrr laws to the Australian parliament and not to the House of Commons?

    Passport Seizures To Keep UK Jihadis Out
    David Cameron is to fast-track plans to confiscate passports and stop those who have joined terror groups returning to the UK.
    http://news.sky.com/video/1373420/bercow-calls-for-straight-dealing

    What Are The New Anti-Terror Powers?
    Passports can be cancelled or confiscated, suspected fighters would be stopped from returning to the UK and more.
    http://news.sky.com/story/1373230/what-are-the-new-anti-terror-powers

  • doug scorgie

    Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)
    13 Nov, 2014 – 9:58 pm

    “That, Doug, might give the normal reader the impression that executions are OK if they occur after a trial and/or if they were for murder or treason.”
    ……………

    Some (many?) people believe in the death penalty for capital crimes but I’m sure those same people would be against the execution of political prisoners.

    I am against capital punishment.

    It was your sidekick Resident Dissident that claimed 5000 political executions (12 Nov, 2014 – 11:01 pm):

    “Political executions under Castro – per the respected historian Hugh Thomas – around 5000”

    As you know I have already shown that the right-wing establishment historian, Hugh Swynnerton Thomas, Baron Thomas of Swynnerton did not know:

    (a) How many executions took place.

    (b) What the executions were carried out for.

    He was speculating but ResDis, one of our right-wing, narrow minded tosspots, takes it as proven fact.

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    Hardly, Doug.

    Hugh Thomas was estimating and offering no guarantee for his figures, and you took several lines yesterday to tell us that his figures were estimates and therefore without guarantee.

    So you agree with the eminent historian Hugh Thomas (whose book on the Spanish civil war is generally recognised to be the standard work).

    Were there any other “points” than that in your longish post?

    And why are you criticising Resident Dissident who, after all, was only referring to a historian with whom you agree?

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    Mr Scorgie

    “Some (many?) people believe in the death penalty for capital crimes but I’m sure those same people would be against the execution of political prisoners.”
    _____________________

    You have obviously forgottten that in many of the left-wing tyrannies you support (or have supported, doubtlessly), some political offences are in fact capital crimes for which execution is the penalty.

  • Jemand

    There is too much presumption in believing that “The Law” has the ultimate power, ultimate correctness and boundless authority. And from this there is too much faith placed in the judicial system.

    The Law can be ignored by anybody who has enough clout to get away with it. Either because the people who administer The Law are easily intimidated or bribed, or because they can safely ignore it if it is convenient to do so.

    People just turn a blind eye, just like they do in business. There are plenty of rules that say you must do or not do ‘this’ and ‘that’, but all one needs to do is construct an irrational but elaborate and forceful argument that negates the applicability of the rule and be in a position to resist its application.

    We see it time and time again in politics, industry and civil behaviour. Laws are only enforceable when you have the will and physical power to enforce them against little or no resistance.

    Hence why we see so many world and business leaders escape prosecution for their respective crimes.

    So I think the lesson here is that you should never underestimate the inclination and power of officials to ignore the application of The Law or sandbag any prosecution of it.

  • doug scorgie

    Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)
    14 Nov, 2014 – 10:17 pm

    “Mr Scorgie”
    “You have obviously forgottten that in many of the left-wing tyrannies you support (or have supported, doubtlessly), some political offences are in fact capital crimes for which execution is the penalty.”
    ……………

    Name the left-wing tyrannies have I supported Habbabkuk and provide your evidence.

    Also:

    Which political offences are capital crimes and which countries carry out such executions?

  • Resident Dissident

    Scorgie

    You really are quite pathetic – it is quite clear that Hugh Thomas was referring to political executions and not executions for criminal offences. If you bother to look at the claims made by a variety of sources you will see that there is a wide range of estimates for political executions going as high as 33,000 – Hugh Thomas being a professional historian was giving his estimate having considered a range of evidence. Of course no one can offer precision on these matters even I suspect the thugs doing and commissioning the killing, and of course it will need a regime in Cuba that is committed to freedom of speech and expression before we will ever know the full story – but let us not forget that even Castro claimed to have held 25,000 political prisoners in his own words.

    As for your statement about things having improved – well I daresay they have, but the same claim could be made for the Soviet Union after Stalin’s purges – but that does not mean that the situation became acceptable or that the original crimes can be expunged from the record or the perpetrators be forgiven, or even belittled by reference to considerably less significant human rights abuses – which is of course what Goss did by claiming that the crimes at Guantanamo (about 800 arrested and 8 deaths in detention) were worse than those committed elsewhere on the island and then you supported as his lickspittle. This is of course just a repeat performance for Mr Goss – who can forget his Holodomor denial, his constant evasion and whataboutery when it comes to the many crimes of the Soviet Union or his continued silence regarding whether or not he supported the activities of Solidarity and other free trade unions in the Soviet bloc.

    And of course what do we have from you as evidence to support your view that all in the Cuban garden is now lovely – recollections from your many holidays, where I suspect there was pretty much full time chaperoning by carefully selected government employees whose main function was ensuring that there were not too many hard questions by maintaining a constant flow of cheap alcohol, visits to model installations and ensuring that proportion of local to visiting prostitutes were kept with the usual bounds of tolerance. Perhaps Mr Goss experienced something similar on cycling trips and other excursions to the old Soviet bloc.

    Of course perhaps you spent your time on Cuba in discussions with dissidents who opposed the government line, or you read newspapers or listened to the radio or watched tv, or even read bloggers who didn’t follow the prevailing line? Or is it just that 100% of the population in Cuba agree with the Government line (that is of course till they escape and then are subject to brainwashing by the CIA?

    BTW your selective quotation out of context of HRW 1999 report is something of which you must be very proud – perhaps you could do something similar for all the subsequent HRW, Amnesty International and Journalists without Borders reports – or perhaps you might just wish to resort to your old favourite of Whitewash Weekly.

  • guano

    Jemand:
    “So I think the lesson here is that you should never underestimate the inclination and power of officials to ignore the application of The Law or sandbag any prosecution of it.”

    Yes Jemand, That is why you see in the Monotheist religions a vast compilation of jurisdictions taken out of context to permit the clearly impermissible, permissable, for those in power who wish to bend the rules.

    And that is why you see an unholy alliance of three political Islams, the Jewish, the Christian and the current up to date version, to wreck the lives of ordinary, practising Muslims in places like Libya and Syria.

    Political Islam isn’t Islam, any of them.

  • Habbabkuk (la vita è bella)

    Resident Dissident

    Well, I think you’ve just wiped the floor pretty comprehensively with young Doug Scorgie.

    Compare and contrast your splendid taking him to the cleaners with his pathetically feeble attempt to do the same to me (his post at 16h06 refers).

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