Losing Bet

by craig on July 24, 2013 11:12 pm in Uncategorized

I lost my money on the name of the royal baby.  Still, I suppose “Privileged Wanker” was always a very long shot.

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162 Comments

  1. Ohhh Ambassador, you do spoil us!

  2. i think you still won your bet

  3. Ooooft! Lol..Watch out though Craig,you might get the Hasbara phalanx gang on your case for not agreeing with everything the Gubnint and Establishment want us to think and that life is perfick! ;.)

  4. David McCann

    25 Jul, 2013 - 1:06 am

    Glad to see you are back in form. Watch out for the cyber police- though I expect you are well known to them already!

  5. BrianFujisan

    25 Jul, 2013 - 2:12 am

    Nice one Craig
    Great to see you back, Hope your fit for the Rabbit fest

  6. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!)

    25 Jul, 2013 - 6:49 am

    Craig’s new post – of one were of optimistic disposition – could be the starting point for a number of substantive and well-reasoned discussions as recently called for by our moderator.

    For example, has the Monarchy a future in the UK, its rôle in the UK’s constitutional arrangements, more widely, the UK’s constitutional arrangements as a whole. Or, expanding somewhat, the nature of privilege – is it inevitable, is it necessarily a negative phenomenon (and if so, what could be done about it, and how), etc.

    Although we must of course wait to see what the day brings, first signs do not seem encouraging (posts on Hasbara, the cyber-police, Greek ‘internment camps’ and ‘zero-hour contracts’)….

  7. Sofia Kibo Noh

    25 Jul, 2013 - 7:29 am

    I lost my money too, though I still hold out with the faint hope that the sources are wrong and the boy’s real name is “Parasite”.

    And @Dad. 6 49am

    “… privilege – is it inevitable, is it necessarily a negative phenomenon…”

    Come on. Please expand. Give us a laugh.

  8. Airdrieonian

    25 Jul, 2013 - 7:33 am

    Privilege is analogue.
    I feel privileged to be living in an age of antibiotics and technology.
    It’s not the bairn’s fault who its brood mare and sire are.

  9. How else can we beat Humanity down- with out a Royal charter acting as chief whip!?

    Though really aren’t all children to be treated as Princes amd Princesses?

  10. LOL. I was hoping for “Dwayne”. “Dwayne, Prince of Cambridge” – ‘sa video game, ennit*?

    News to me Cambridge was a principality, btw. Durham actually used to be one – would have been a much better choice of arbitrary title to emphasise the superiority of the Battenberg family.

    * No, it isn’t. I’m thinking of “Dwayne, Prince of Thieves”. Better still.

  11. Thanks for that link to the fascists making laws to stifle protests, someone, no doubt their expectancy will deliver some justifications.
    Whilst here an unaccountable political police force is trying to stifle singing protests songs and farting in public, steered by their loving police federation, always good at getting money out of taxpayers for falling over kerb stones, surprise surprise, Obumarse had the same idea for his US citizens.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/obama-wages-war-on-whistleblowers-and-journalists-a-912852.html

  12. You can’t blame the child.
    As its parents are unemployed and on state benefits, statistically, there is a good chance they divorce within a year. If the father spends all his benefits on beer and fags, and the mother becomes a junky, the kid could be taken into care by social services.
    Maybe a nice childless couple could adopt him, and he grows up to be a doctor?
    It’s not the kids fault.

  13. It looks like the spy operations does have a commercial aim after all,i.e. the transfer of highly commercial know how from small and medium companies, to large multinational concerns who are in bed with Government and are rewarded in lieu so to speak.

    Just speculating on a story. why else would this spying be felt most by our economic motors of Western Europe? small and medium businesses?

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/german-firms-fear-industrial-espionage-after-snowden-leaks-a-912624.html

  14. Googling the emetica I note that the EDP is speculating about the next visit of Them to Sandringham:

    Large crowds could pose extra problems for both the police and members of the public, many of whom are regulars who attend every year, some driving half way across the country and queueing in the cold hours before dawn to secure their spot.

    http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/when_will_the_prince_of_cambridge_make_his_first_visit_to_norfolk_1_2295264

    Who ARE the demented products of retrograde evolution who do this? We need more asylums.

  15. And finally before I slink off to work, an interview with Snowden lawyer Ms. Kucherena.
    He, through her, sounds like a scared man.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/interview-with-edward-snowden-lawyer-anatoly-kucherena-a-912884.html

  16. Moving swiftly on from the problems of keeping mad people under control at Sandringham to the inconvenience experienced by the police when assaulting members of the public (allegedly):

    http://www.london24.com/news/crime/protester_sues_met_over_palestine_demo_kettle_1_2296920

    Yo, Habba!

  17. Battenberg is a cake. Isn’t it?

    I cannot for the life of me imagine referring to a tiny baby as George. Or even a little lad of ten or so. Surely it’s a name for a middle aged accountant? Or a retired colonel?

  18. The baby is innocent, it is a new born child, it can have done no injustice, it couldn’t choose it’s parents.

    It can’t answer back, it is defenceless.

  19. Ah. As an Irish person, you may be unaware of the connection with our noble Royal House, which you so ungraciously kicked out in/by 1922. So are most English persons, btw. The Royal Family is Engerlish, and not a bit German, obviously.

    One of the original couple’s sons, Prince Alexander of Battenberg, was made Sovereign Prince of Bulgaria; he was later forced to abdicate.

    Another son, Prince Henry of Battenberg, married The Princess Beatrice, the youngest daughter of Queen Victoria; their daughter, Victoria Eugenia Julia Ena, became queen consort of Spain. Her uncle Edward VII elevated her style to Royal Highness, so that she would have the necessary status to marry into the Spanish royal house.

    Alexander and Julia’s eldest son, Prince Louis of Battenberg, became the First Sea Lord of the Royal Navy. Due to anti-German feelings prevalent in Britain during World War I, he anglicised his name to Mountbatten, as did his children and nephews, the sons of Prince Henry and Princess Beatrice. They renounced all German titles and were granted peerages by their cousin, George V: Prince Louis became the 1st Marquess of Milford Haven, while Prince Alexander, Prince Henry’s eldest son, became the 1st Marquess of Carisbrooke.

    Prince Louis’s second daughter Princess Louise of Battenberg become Queen Consort of Sweden as she married Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden in 1923 and his younger son Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma served as the last Viceroy of India. Prince Louis’s elder daughter, Princess Alice of Battenberg, married Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark; their son, Prince Philippos of Greece and Denmark (now Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh), married the heiress presumptive of the British throne, later Elizabeth II, after having renounced his Greek titles and taken his grandfather’s and uncle’s surname, Mountbatten. The name Battenberg, in its anglicised form, is now a part of the personal surname, Mountbatten-Windsor, of some members of the British Royal Family. Prince Francis Joseph of Battenberg married Princess Anna of Montenegro, sister of Queen Elena of Italy and a maternal aunt of Alexander I of Yugoslavia.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battenberg_family

    I’m assuming that an Irish person knows all about the, er Glorious Revolution, and the Hanoverians whose descendant Liz is. I won’t labour that point.

  20. It can’t answer back, it is defenceless.

    If you discount the sworn allegiance of our armed forces to HM, her heirs and successors….

  21. All that intermarrying. The family tree must look rather like a cat’s cradle.

  22. You could say it’s all nicely tied up, couldn’t you? It’s what monarchies do.

  23. Flaming June

    25 Jul, 2013 - 9:08 am

    The corporate media has shown its utterly craven nature https://twitter.com/brianwhelanhack/status/359777769242112001/photo/1 with the birth of this ‘royal’ baby when the shredding of babies with brown skins to the east is worthy at the most of a very brief report followed by something like ‘the UN are investigating’.

    The pregnancy, the birth and now the naming of the baby has been one giant propaganda exercise. I know I am stating the obvious.

    Give me strength!

  24. Bravo Scriptonite – we love you.

  25. Tied up. That poor wee lad has no idea what’s ahead of him. It wouldn’t be the life I’d choose, myself. Goldfish bowl with benefits.

  26. This post may turn out to be unfair – only yesterday I was considering the ramifications of the royal baby growing up to be an outspoken republican.

    Well, one can hope!

  27. “If you discount the sworn allegiance of our armed forces to HM, her heirs and successors….”

    Well yes, I obviously do discount them.

    It’s just a helpless baby just the same as every other new born baby, it has no control over it’s environment whatsoever.

    I can understand hating someone for what they do, I don’t understand hating someone for who they are.

  28. No point in hating the little fella. His life is already all mapped out for him. Imagine already being able to say what he’ll be doing when he’s 50+. Dreadful.

    As a matter of interest, what freedom does he have? I suppose he could throw it all to one side and abdicate when the time comes. Or before.

  29. Didn’t you once take that oath, Komodo?

  30. Who’s hating it, Fred? I’m not. I wish the sprog all the best for the future. Especially if it manages to evade its appalling background, get a good job (courtesy of the Back to Work Scheme, with A4E’s assistance, maybe) and never pollute a tabloid front page again. It’s never too late to escape your upbringing. And it will be a lot happier, I’d guess, assuming its IQ hasn’t atrophied to the extent that most royals’ seem to.

    But as a democrat of sorts, I can’t condone inherited privilege, social status and wealth. I make no apology for deprecating those.

  31. If I told you, I’d have to kill you, Anon.

  32. Has the baby been outed as a ziofuckwit yet?

  33. Jon

    ‘…yesterday I was considering the ramifications of the royal baby growing up to be an outspoken republican.’

    He’d end up like his grandmother.

  34. No doubt its bris will be performed by the new Chief Rabbi*, Anon. But I wasn’t going to mention it until you raised the topic.

    *
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/10104322/New-chief-rabbi-rejects-10million-house-in-favour-of-suburbia.html

    Good example for Prince Dwayne, imo. Hope the snip takes.

  35. The monarchy should have been abolished centuries back. There has never been a good King or Queen of England. Some were not as bad as others but they were all bad eggs. There were forty plus executions authorised by George III with crimes ranging from buggery to treason but the wives he had executed were probably beheaded because he had a new shag on the go. The new baby’s grandmother, Princess Diana, was just the latest in a long history of Royal murders. The new George would have a better life as an ordinary citizen. Ditch these hangers on and save some taxes, sell their art treasures, feed the poor, find jobs and houses for the young unemployed.

  36. I heard the 4 hour delay between the birth and the announcement was due to a badly fitting skin. Adjustments had to be made, as you could still see the scales in places.

  37. “But as a democrat of sorts, I can’t condone inherited privilege, social status and wealth. I make no apology for deprecating those.”

    I don’t think the Royals are too fond of the tabloids either. I think the tabloids target them because they are so popular with the people, they sell a lot of newspapers. That’s democracy in action, a referendum every day where people vote with their wallets and it’s looking to me like the Republicans are very much a minority right now.

    And as for the “I won’t hate them if they try to be more like I am”, now where have I heard that before.

  38. And as for the “I won’t hate them if they try to be more like I am”, now where have I heard that before.

    From an English immigrant to Scotland, perhaps?

  39. Sofia Kibo Noh

    25 Jul, 2013 - 10:09 am

    @Fred.

    You are right. There’s no shortage of hate. The child is clearly an innocent babe.

    Sadly his upbringing will almost certainly produce a parasite.

    But you never know. Like the Buddha, he may grow up to reject it all and inspire multitudes to live useful and compassionate lives a couple of thousand wears hence.

    As I said a few days a go, I wish the sprog a healthy and useful life.

  40. Sofia Kibo Noh

    25 Jul, 2013 - 10:13 am

    Oops!

    Maybe even a couple of hundred years hence.

  41. More seriously:

    I don’t think the Royals are too fond of the tabloids either. I think the tabloids target them because they are so popular with the people, they sell a lot of newspapers. That’s democracy in action, a referendum every day where people vote with their wallets and it’s looking to me like the Republicans are very much a minority right now.

    I see your point, but how popular could they possibly be without the constant publicity, generated from a fawningly adoring standpoint? I might suggest that cigarettes are a marvellous and desirable product, by your logic, too. Every day their users vote with their wallets – and pay rather more than they do for a copy of the Sun…

  42. “I might suggest that cigarettes are a marvellous and desirable product, by your logic, too. Every day their users vote with their wallets”

    That’s not voting. That’s addiction.

  43. Sofia,
    Are you baking? You have hundreds and thousands all over the place.

  44. I’m a republican, Craig, but this post doesn’t do justice to your work.

    The child might be privileged, but certainly an unwitting beneficiary of it. As for being a “wanker”, only time will tell.

    If republicanism is to have a fighting chance in the UK, it must be led with dignity, political shrewdness and a workable alternative ready to be put in place. Surly and churlish snipes at the royals do no service to UK republicanism. It’s sounds all too French.

    As for names, I also lost some bets. I was thinking ‘Steve’, ‘Mohammed’, ‘Jesus’, ‘Kevin’ – all very popular names around the world. 

    Good tho’, to see that you bouncing back. How are those spurs coming/going?

  45. That’s not voting. That’s addiction.

    True. I’d like you to think a little more deeply about that, though…

    :-)

  46. Also good to see that Kate is pregnant again so soon after giving birth – or is it a reluctant twin?

  47. How are those spurs coming/going?

    —–

    Craig has one of these in his kitchen. I’ve heard he’s doing very well.
    http://www.bouncetime.co.uk/rodeo/rodeobull.jpg

  48. Sofia Kibo Noh

    25 Jul, 2013 - 10:31 am

    @Dreoilin.

    Thanks for the correction. “Thousands” then.

    I’m not baking alas, just making a hames of multi-tasking.

    It’s hard, don’t you know, to get good domestic staff these days so I even have to dress myself now.

  49. Dreoilin, good therapy for a dicky back? I wouldn’t like to bounce over the edge of that air mattress.

  50. “I’d like you to think a little more deeply about that, though…”

    Well you’ll have to wait. I had an exhausting day yesterday and I can’t think very deeply about anything (as my previous comments have shown).

    “Also good to see that Kate is pregnant again so soon after giving birth – or is it a reluctant twin?”

    I think it takes 10 days or longer for the uterus to reduce to normal size, you naughty thing you.

    “It’s hard, don’t you know, to get good domestic staff these days so I even have to dress myself now.”

    Hahaha – same here. It’s terrible. My stays are killing me, laced up all wrong.

    “I wouldn’t like to bounce over the edge of that air mattress.”

    No indeed! Even bouncing onto it doesn’t look like fun to me. Wish I’d tried it when I was 22 though.

  51. “Tied up. That poor wee lad has no idea what’s ahead of him. It wouldn’t be the life I’d choose, myself. Goldfish bowl with benefits.”

    Or maybe follow in the footsteps of Aunt Nerissa and Katherine.

    The wheel is still in spin.

  52. Uzbek in the UK

    25 Jul, 2013 - 10:54 am

    I am not a royalist but need to admit that he is just a baby. The problem is not with him but with the system. And with majority of Brits who tolerate medieval practises. And for the establishment it is again one of those cases which reminds the world (but most of all to them) about great British past.

  53. Alfred the Great.

    Only guessing though.

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_the_Great

    How well do you think any system would work out?

    Most here could not manage prohibitiion!

  54. Will they call him “Wee Dod” at Balmoral or just “Your Royal Highness”?

  55. Some wise words from Rev Lucy Winkett Rector St James’ Piccadilly. She used to be at St Paul’s.

    How do we choose what work we do, what our workplaces are like, our pay and what is necessary for the work environment with special reference to the shortage of A&E doctors and why the ‘crisis’ there has arisen.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01d848j 2mins 49

    ~~

    There is a link to a TFTD by Lord Sacks on the same page.

    I heard Quentin Letts on Radio 4 yesterday morning with a programme about the new Chief Rabbi. Interesting that Charles Clarke contacted the Chief Rabbi and all the other main religious leaders immediately after 7/7 in an attempt to avoid any ‘inter communal tension’.
    The Chief Rabbi
    What’s the Point of …, Series 5 Episode 1 of 4

    Duration: 28 minutes
    First broadcast:Wednesday 24 July 2013Sir Jonathan Sacks stands down this August after more than 20 years in a job that some people have described as tougher than the Archbishop of Canterbury’s – but with better jokes.

    The office of the Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregation of the United kingdom and the Commonwealth – to give it its full title – has always had close links to the political establishment.
    First Edward V11 and now David Cameron have spoken of “My Chief Rabbi.” A seat in the House of Lords seems to go with the territory these days. In September, Ephraim Mirvis will become the next Chief Rabbi, with ready access to the stars of the Cabinet and the Media. So what does the Chief Rabbi do? How much does it cost to run his office?

    The full title is important. It’s especially important to Reform and Liberal Jews who point out that the Chief Rabbi (of the United Hebrew Congregation of the United kingdom and the Commonwealth) doesn’t represent them. In fact, he represents only about half of Jews affiliated to a synagogue. The fastest growing Jewish denomination is the ultra Orthodox – and he doesn’t officially lead them either.

    So what’s the point of the Chief Rabbi? Historian Geoffrey Alderman thinks that, if there used to be a point to the office, there is no longer; Michael Howard thinks the point of the Chief Rabbi is to present a moderate religious voice in a world of growing religious extremism, and Vanessa Feltz thinks it’s so that she has someone – other than herself – to argue with.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0375xv2

  56. Well said Craig. Sometimes you gotta spit venom in the face of relentless royal propaganda just to keep yourself smiling.

  57. Wealth and status always hang by a thread. Wasn’t Edward IV a bastard?

  58. To balance all the sycophantic drivel that has been bombarding my auditory and visual systems, there is a need for Craig’s comment, and if the others fail to see that, then as per the general principle of the Zeitgeist; tough!

  59. http://www.london24.com/news/crime/protester_sues_met_over_palestine_demo_kettle_1_2296920

    I woz there Komodo. Scary stuff. Police helicopters overhead, very many police were in riot gear and handlers had German shepherd dogs straining at the leash. The protesters were being squeezed into a space that didn’t exist. It was pure provocation. Dozens and dozens of police vans packed full of personnel were waiting to come from the side streets and the traffic was closed off in Kensington High Street. We were all being filmed of course.

    Yet, in Israel, just ONE member of the IDF gets into bother for stealing from the Mavi Marmara flotilla. Richard Silverstein is slightly wrong in his piece. One of the dead was American.

    http://www.richardsilverstein.com/2013/07/24/israel-looted-millions-in-mavi-marmara-booty-yet-punishes-1-soldier-for-stealing-a-laptop/

  60. “Like the Buddha, he may grow up to reject it all and inspire multitudes to live useful and compassionate lives a couple of thousand wears hence.”

    Lets grant you that the Buddha did attain enlightenment but that he did “inspire multitudes to live useful and compassionate lives a couple of thousand wears hence”, is that a theory or a fact?

  61. FACT. Now bugger off to the forest and listen for falling trees before I clap your head with one hand.

  62. How to build your baby bullshit bunker

    23-07-13

    THE Daily Mash presents a step-by-step guide to hiding out until the madness has passed.

    The gas mask isn’t necessary but it looks good
    You are the sanest person in your street

    The royal baby has arrived and you must act quickly to safeguard your family’s sanity as the ensuing bullshit turns millions of ordinary people into maniacs.

    Here’s how to construct a simple media-proof baby bullshit bunker:

    /..
    http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/features/how-to-build-your-baby-bullshit-bunker-2013072376553

  63. “To balance all the sycophantic drivel that has been bombarding my auditory and visual systems, there is a need for Craig’s comment, and if the others fail to see that, then as per the general principle of the Zeitgeist; tough!”

    I feel the same about football, tennis, Olympic Games, all sorts of things that don’t interest me in the least but are bombarded at me by the media. I just ignore them. Wouldn’t want them to abolish football just for me even though I think the world would be a better place without it.

  64. As Alan Partridge pointed out in Anglia Square, Norwich, the arrival of the nation’s little darling coincided with the anniversary of the death of Qusay and Uday, Saddam Hussein’s equally lovable (in theory) offspring….

  65. Another George is going around today upping the hype on the growth in the economy by a massive 0.6%. Wow. Where is it? Not where I am. Maybe in the construction in London of towers of steel, glass and cement for future office workers. I have never seen so many of those cement mixer lorries in one day as I saw yesterday in London.

    http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/news/article-2377557/UK-road-recovery-economy-grows-0-6-second-quarter.html

  66. The irony is you’re all talking about the royal baby…

  67. That’s the topic. Far be it from me to digress into Israel’s plans to build a very large rail network connecting its cities/ further dividing and sterilising the West Bank bantustans. Would it surprise me if those rail lines needed a security corridor x00 metres wide? It wouldn’t.

    This is what reality on the ground requires …

    Facts on the ground. A resonance.

    http://www.haaretz.com/news/national/.premium-1.537737

  68. Can we really afford this nonsense?

    Operation protect Prince George: Police throw up ring of steel around Middleton family home as new royal family arrive
    Police patrolling 18-acre Bucklebury Manor on foot, horseback and by air
    Experts say security significantly higher since Prince George’s birth
    Royal babies have been targets by kidnappers and attackers in the past
    Kate, William and George stayed with Carole and Michael last night

    By Martin Robinson

    25 July 2013

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2377611/Operation-protect-Prince-George-Police-throw-ring-steel-Middleton-family-home-new-royal-family-arrive.html

    We are already saddled with the cost of protecting our ME envoy, Mr B.Liar. Was it £250,000 pa?

  69. Ha! He’s not a wanker yet – give him about fourteen years.

    Amazingly, I actually predicted the little bugger’s name. Now kicking myself for not nipping down to Ladbrooke’s while I had the chance.

  70. well said, anon. irony indeed.
    still, I’m sure it won’t be long until it goes off topic and all the usual suspects continue with their personal hobby horses and/or ad hom attacks and bickering.

  71. Privileged certainly.
    Wanker time will tell.

  72. Jermand 10:24

    I actually spotted 100-1 being offered on Muhammed. Can’t remember the precise betting service now – but think it was Ladbrokes.

    Surprisingly short odds eh? – until you factor in a degree of wishful-thinking that the circumstances surrounding the paternal grandmother’s death might at last be met with something more convincing than indignant, outright denial.

    Those ‘two boys’ have one hell of a legacy to come to terms with as they get older and their understanding of how things REALLY work progresses.

  73. Don’t have a go at an innocent baby Craig. Wait and see first.

  74. Fred says;

    I feel the same about football, tennis, Olympic Games, all sorts of things that don’t interest me in the least …. just ignore … Wouldn’t want them to abolish … for me even .. a better place without ..

    Fred old stick, appreciating your high tolerance and threshold of propaganda. But there is a slight difficulty in imagining a footballer’s ascent on any laws, before these go onto statute, probably despite their wishes too.

    However to find a chief Plutocrat/Oligarch who is ensconced amidst the population of the lesser plutocrats to be equated to some pissant footballer or a pop singer is not perhaps the best of comparisons won’t you agree?

  75. Wikispooks 25 Jul, 2013 – 1:00 pm

    Surprisingly short odds eh?

    Very surprising. I don’t really grasp your explanation for such odds. Looks like a dead cert to me.

  76. Flaming June

    25 Jul, 2013 - 1:16 pm

    Komodo Did the Ha’aretz piece say anything about Veolia collaborating in the ‘West Bank’ railway plan? They were involved in the Jerusalem light railway project and have been boycotted ever since.

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-announces-plans-for-west-bank-train-network/

    http://electronicintifada.net/content/veolia-still-intertwined-israels-occupation/8448

    http://www.veolia.com/en/medias/focus-on/jlrt.htm

  77. Sofia Kibo Noh

    25 Jul, 2013 - 1:16 pm

    @Villager. 11 24am

    Yes. I forgot about all those Buddhist Holy Wars and Conquests, then there was the infamous Buddhist Inquisition, all those book and witch-burnings and then the Dalai Lama giving America to King Philip of Spain.

    But apart from those little inconveniences I’d say I stand by my statement and my wish for little boy George is that “…Like the Buddha, he may grow up to reject it all and inspire multitudes to live useful and compassionate lives a couple of thousand wears hence.”

    They say travel (out there) broadens the mind. I think you would enjoy it too. You can take your Book with you but just try looking outwards for some of the time.

    @Mark. 11 20am

    I wonder which genius came up with the idea of patrilineal bloodlines. Generations of smug mothers will have had the last laugh on that one.

  78. Just a reminder of my departure.

    Jemand has turned out to be the best of a bad lot.

  79. Closet Irish:

    Boy George, Louis Walsh and Bono’s granda Alexander.

    QED.

  80. George Alexander Louis. If I were asked to think of three imperial names those would probably be the three, living as I do in the eighteenth century.

  81. Veolia…their side.

    http://www.veolia.com/en/medias/focus-on/jlrt.htm

    Light railway/tram setup. Don’t think they’ll be tendering for the full monty.

    Brat:

    McGonagall lives!

    http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/carlisle-poet-s-verse-dedicated-to-new-royal-baby-1.1072841

    (container for stomach contents available from Duchy Ripoffs plc, with princely crest)

  82. Sofia Kibo Noh

    25 Jul, 2013 - 2:10 pm

    Rex?

  83. Thanks, Trowbridge. Good luck with your trip.

    Regarding the short betting odds on the name ‘Mohammed’ for the young prince, you have to remember that the odds do potentially influence the outcome. Given that they were 100 to 1, I think the royal couple were nuts for not having slammed down £10M and naming little Prince Mo accordingly – later renaming him and cutting him in for a third. So that risk might have explained the trepidation in bumping up the odds.

  84. Flaming June

    25 Jul, 2013 - 2:17 pm

  85. I think that was Rex as in “(whistle) Here, Rex! Here, boy! Get down offa the fella’s leg, Rex!”. Prince ditto. Or Satan.

  86. Sofia Kibo Noh

    25 Jul, 2013 - 2:51 pm

    @Flaming and Komodo.

    Yes. Rex is a kind of Pick-and -Mix royal name.

    Ruler of his own realm deffinitely, but useful for fetching sticks and providing the masses with entertainment with unembarrassed displays of scratching, aggressive vocalisations and uninhibited public sex. Now that might be worth turning out to see!

  87. Also OT. Guess who’s discovered oil in Malawi.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/23/tony-blair-malawi-arrest

    Is it just me or has his appearance mutated from merely deranged to batshit crazy?

  88. At precious, tender and auspicious moments like these, I really miss Norman St John Stevas, don’t you?

    Long Live Kings Charles III (the ‘Old Pretender’?), William V and George VII!

    Wow – King Farouk was right! In the end, after all the revolutions, all that will be left will be the four kings of cards nd the King of England. Now, in this country, we have three kings and a queen! Just one more king to go, and we’ll have a card game!

  89. Flaming June

    25 Jul, 2013 - 3:29 pm

    I rather like the sound of Justin Well-Be-Loved’s initiative v Wonga and co. Must have somewhat narked Agent Cameron whose little helper Jonathan Luff left No 10 to join them.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/david-cameron-adviser-jonathan-luff-quits-to-join-payday-lender-wonga-as-lobbyist-8262326.html

  90. Uzbek in the UK

    25 Jul, 2013 - 3:32 pm

    Suhayl Saadi,

    You think very little of the hierarchy in the House of Windsor. There is only the Queen and the rest are Princes. You can of course call them Kings but then you have to add ‘in waiting’. I read once a very interesting article about laws concerning monarchy in Britain. It is hard to imagine but there are more laws concerning monarchy in modern Britain (most still in practice) than in many other vital modern days issues such as healthcare or trade. The only exception was law on taxes but despite thousands of bills concerning taxation in Britain multinationals still avoid paying taxes finding multiple loopholes in this complicated system.

  91. Unelected unaccountable free-loading feudal fascistic relic.How very sad for him to be born to such a family.

  92. Three princes, Uzbek? I make it 11, plus a couple of dodgy ones- Edward’s male offering, Viscount Severn, and a relic of the Hanoverian succession possibly legitimisable as Prince James of Wessex. NB, Wessex is not a county. There are also 13 princesses, 7 by marriage and 6 by inheritance, this time including Edward’s female offering.

  93. “The irony is you’re all talking about the royal baby …”

    Yes, but it’s all Craig’s fault.

    Any aristocrats here? Have you got your wild animals locked up?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/10202296/Aristocrat-warns-visitors-after-big-cat-photographed-on-his-estate.html

    Looks like the Beast of Bodmin is on the prowl.

  94. Uzbek in the UK

    25 Jul, 2013 - 4:03 pm

    Komodo,

    I did not say there were 3 Princes I said the rest are Princes. I am not an expert in British monarchic family but I feel there are many more than you listed, depending of the starting point of the counting and inclusion rules.

  95. That’s a GIGANTIC…solar garden light. Pussycat. No question of it. Very tasty, they are, too. For a fee, I will agree to roam the estate semi-surreptitiously and eat it.

  96. Sorry, Uzbek, technical point to you. My criterion was live ones. We’re still waiting for Andrew’s and Edward’s grandchildren, I think, and Anne’s offspring don’t get the prince treatment because she’s a girl* (and the one member of the family who’d make a decent monarch, IMO)

    *term used for comic effect

  97. Did you mean Norman, Baron Cringe-On-All Fours-ly St. John Fawsley, Suhayl? It’s so important to give due recognition to the titles…

  98. Sofia Kibo Noh

    25 Jul, 2013 - 4:16 pm

  99. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!)

    25 Jul, 2013 - 4:46 pm

    Mmmm, I can now understand more fully why this is the third most read political/economic/social blog in the UK.

    Some wonderfully thoughtful insights (“the pregnancy, the birth and b-now the naming of the child has been one giant propaganda exercise”), a lot of tight, well-reasoned argument and discussion (“unelected unaccountable free-loading feudal fascistic relic”), and some useful suggestions as to the way forward, placing the Royal Family firmly in the context of the present economic difficulties (“ditch these hangers on and save some taxes, sell their art treasures, feed the poor, find jobs and houses for the young unemployed”), all expressed in splendidly articulate, elegant and even witty language ( “brood mare and sire”) which neglects no conceivable aspect of the Royal birth and its implications (“no doubt its ‘bris’ will be performed by the new Chief Rabbi”). And as a special treat, a tutorial on the geneaology and history of the House of Windsor with special reference to the names used over time. And, finally, contributions placing this Royal event firmly within the context of other national and international developments (the new Chief Rabbi, Veolia’s work on the West Bank railway plan, etc…).

    Carry on, Team Revolution, you’re doing a great job. Venceremos!

    (honorable exceptions : Fred, Anon, Juteman, Jemand, Jay, Jake and Grant)

    ******************

    La vita è bella, life is good!

  100. My last contribution for today

    Big blue cock erected on fourth plinth in London’s Trafalgar Square

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/jul/25/big-blue-cock-trafalgar-square

    “If you were to Google the sculpture in a few year’s time,” [Boris Johnson] said, “search engines would collapse at the behest of the prime minister. Er, quite properly of course.” He warmed to the theme later. “You would be forbidden by prime ministerial edict from looking at it,” he told journalists. After a meaningful pause, he added: “Quite right too.”

  101. If there’s one thing more ridiculous than discussing this royal family, it’s supporting them.

    Their constitutional function is to distract from parliament, where the real levers of power lie, yet that function is much better performed today by media, slebs, games and other wonders.

    Little wonder the main parties are now so keen to ensure only centrally coordinated candidates are selected.

    It’s amazing to think that were people up and down the country to elect their own truly local candidates, they’d immediately have power in their hands. The Westminster Parliament really is quite a revolutionary body, despite appearances.

  102. So I wrote this fairy story for the new royal prince. Bless. Took me four hours.

    http://johngossip.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/nanna-babba-and-common-girl.html

    I know, I need to get a life.

  103. Flaming June

    25 Jul, 2013 – 11:23 am

    http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/07/25/pers-j25.html

  104. Habbabkuk at 4.46pm

    You know, it’s taken you a while but I think you are finally starting to get a feel for the genius of this blog!

  105. Flaming June

    25 Jul, 2013 - 6:40 pm

    Thanks Someone. That report by Bill Van Auken is completely credible.

  106. Yes, I know about the hierarchy, Uzbek in the UK (I was engaging in some absurdist humour), but I didn’t know about all the laws around the institution of monarchy – that is very interesting, thanks.

    Venceremos, indeed! One day, Comrade Habbabkuk, the revolution will come. And on that day, I will make you the Commissar of Blogs.

  107. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!)

    25 Jul, 2013 - 6:49 pm

    @ KingofWelshNoir

    Had you posted before me, I’m sure that I would also have been able to include you in the “honorable exceptions” category. :)

  108. Phil 1:14pm
    “…. Very surprising. I don’t really grasp your explanation for such odds. Looks like a dead cert to me.”

    The odds were on the name, not responsibility for the Alma tunnel incident

    My explanation was to take account of the hopes of those who KNOW that incident was know accident; naming the infant Mohammed would demonstrate that the 2nd in-line knows that too, and a can of worms would be well-and-truly opened. Wishful thinking of course – or something like that.

    Jeman 2:12pm
    Re your £10m bet suggestion:
    I think you’ll find that standard t&c’s for any on-line betting would precluded any such single – or even rapid set of multiple – stake(s)

  109. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!)

    25 Jul, 2013 - 6:51 pm

    @ Suhayl

    And I, in turn, will put you in charge of radio broadcasting!

  110. “Gambia’s now got an 0207 London number if it’s the new tax haven that you’re looking for”

    http://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2013/07/25/ghanas-now-got-an-0207-london-number-if-its-the-new-tax-haven-that-youre-looking-for/

  111. Headline: “Gambia’s now got an 0207 London number if it’s the new tax haven that you’re looking for”

    URL: “www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2013/07/25/ghanas-now-got-an-0207-london-number-if-its-the-new-tax-haven-that-youre-looking-for/

    Is this a aurreptitious slur on the reputation of the Gold Coast, or evidence that the web editor of taxresearch.org.uk is rubbish at geography?

  112. Flaming June

    25 Jul, 2013 - 8:52 pm

    P Harry is going to make sure his nephew has ‘fun’. Leave off Harry. He’s way too young to fly an Apache and operate a machine gun.

    http://persophile.blogspot.co.uk/2008/03/prince-harry-does-bad-things-to-bad.html

  113. Like he’s going to take Louis to a rock festival….with his mates, show him how to roll fat spliffs….
    ‘Look Louis, we’re fine, there’s at least 10 security men looking after us, and the police will turn their back’…..

  114. Sofia, wonderful stuff — ‘travelling outwards’ etc, but i note you didn’t answer my question. Your recent friend and date did as follows:

    “Komodo
    25 Jul, 2013 – 11:29 am
    FACT. Now bugger off to the forest and listen for falling trees before I clap your head with one hand.”

    Very telling that you made no observation about that, Buddhist or not. Try a bit of honest constant awareness instead of your various escapes. Life is lived and understood through its actuality of action, not by playing with some theories however appealing and romantic you may believe them to be.

  115. Ben, for you and thanks for the link the other eve — i’ve lost it if you can post it again please, appreciate it!

    The Doors Universal Mind
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYWz_9XktTA
    —————
    Dreoilin, thanks for your link too — have saved it for cooler climes — very helpful.

  116. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!)

    25 Jul, 2013 - 10:14 pm

    @ Herbie (17h31)

    “…this royal family, it’s supporting them.

    Their constitutional function is to distract from parliament, where the real levers of power lie,…”
    ______________

    Hand on a minute there, Herbie.

    In a little discussion on the UK’s constitution we started on a previous thread, you said that there was a blurring on the executive and the legislature (resulting in an “elective dictatorship”) and that the solution would be to have an executive outside parliament, with a President with “real” power; in this way Parliament could do a proper job of scutinising and controlling the executive.

    But you are now saying that the real levers of power lie in Parliament.

    Have you changed your tune?

  117. And the universal mind reminds me of another obscure but brilliant beatles song:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN9n1bAahg4

    JAI GURU DEVA!

    Words are flowing out like
    Endless rain into a paper cup
    They slither wildly as they slip away across the universe.
    Pools of sorrow waves of joy
    Are drifting through my opened mind
    Possessing and caressing me.

    Jai Guru Deva. Om
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world

    Images of broken light, which
    Dance before me like a million eyes,
    They call me on and on across the universe.
    Thoughts meander like a
    Restless wind inside a letter box
    They tumble blindly as they make their way across the universe.

    Jai Guru Deva. Om
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world

    Sounds of laughter, shades of life
    Are ringing through my opened ears
    Inciting and inviting me.
    Limitless undying love, which
    Shines around me like a million suns,
    It calls me on and on across the universe

    Jai Guru Deva. Om
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Nothing’s gonna change my world
    Jai Guru Deva.
    Jai Guru Deva.
    Jai Guru Deva.
    Jai Guru Deva.
    Jai Guru Deva.
    Jai Guru Deva.

    OM

    Then a George Hari-son one!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLPNrI3OT5g

    Om Hari Om!

    And then a truly obscure one about an obscure place that i’ve happened to be in
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qupu2o7w8W4

  118. “However to find a chief Plutocrat/Oligarch who is ensconced amidst the population of the lesser plutocrats to be equated to some pissant footballer or a pop singer is not perhaps the best of comparisons won’t you agree?”

    All the same to me.

  119. Habby asks:

    “you said that there was a blurring on the executive and the legislature (resulting in an “elective dictatorship”) and that the solution would be to have an executive outside parliament, with a President with “real” power; in this way Parliament could do a proper job of scutinising and controlling the executive.

    But you are now saying that the real levers of power lie in Parliament.”

    I’ve always said that, habby.

    It’s central to my argument, in fact.

    There’s nothing above that contradicts that, though it’s worth pointing out that you seem to have little grasp of the British system of government. That’s understandable, particularly if you’re a member of the vast vast majority of the British public, or a foreigner perhaps.

    Let’s just say that it’s an unusual system of government, from the earlymodern period before enlightenment got off the ground.

  120. Sofia Kibo Noh

    26 Jul, 2013 - 12:27 am

    @Villager
    25 Jul, 2013 – 10:00 pm

    Re Komodo’s post 11:29 am

    You say, “Very telling that you made no observation about that, Buddhist or not.”

    Yes. It tells me that again you jump to an awful lot of conclusions and feel it somehow appropriate to force your superior wisdom down my gullet.

    I can’t for the life of me think why I should have felt the need to make a public observation on a short post that was,

    a. A statement of fact, as in “Fact.”

    b. An exasperated and funny response to your regularly preachy judgements and instructions, “Now bugger off to the forest and listen for falling trees before I clap your head with one hand.”

    If you want to know, it gave me a laugh. (Thanks Komodo.)

    And WTF do you mean by “Buddhist or not”?

    Do you think you are putting down a Buddhist simply because I wrote that my wish for the royal baby is that “…Like the Buddha, he may grow up to reject it all and inspire multitudes to live useful and compassionate lives a couple of thousand wears hence”?

    I respect a lot about the Buddhists I have encountered. Does that make me a Buddhist? What about the people of other beliefs who I also respect? That would make me an Agnostic, Sufi, Methodist, Atheist, Taoist, Buddhist at the very least.

    In the meantime an innocent baby is beginning a life-conditioning that will most likely make him at the very least a parasite and possibly a boastful royal parasite with access to helicopters, machine guns and the like with which to destroy people.

    In the meantime the nightmare of Nakba continues for the Palestinians.

    Nationalists and Corporatists of all hues continue to carve up both physical and cyber space.

    Corporate media whores fill the airwaves and printed media with false, war-stoking narratives while whistleblowers are persecuted or killed.

    Real people suffer unnecessarily, caught up in nightmares of Nakba, environmental and economic desstruction, neofeudalism, banksterism, austerity and more.

    A growing number of people no longer accept the tired, delusional old narratives. On this blog and increasingly within society they are stating that these states of affairs are not OK with them.

    Do your judgements and preaching have any significance? Not to me at any rate.

    I learned long ago to be wary of true believers with their very own exclusive Books of Truth, their self-righteous high-handed sermons and the destruction that so often follows in their wake.

    Let’s debate the issues not the posters.

  121. Flaming June

    26 Jul, 2013 - 5:15 am

    I chime with you Sofia on all of the foregoing.

  122. Flaming June

    26 Jul, 2013 - 7:58 am

    It will be interesting to see how this concludes. Good for the Guardian.

    Prince Charles’s letters: judges allow appeal against block on publication
    High court judges give the Guardian right to challenge cabinet move to keep secret so-called ‘black spider memos’

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk-news/2013/jul/25/prince-charles-letters-judges-allow-appeal

    ‘Three high court judges have given permission for an appeal to be mounted against a decision to conceal details of Prince Charles’s lobbying campaigns.

    The Guardian will seek to overturn a high court ruling this month that the prince’s private efforts to influence public policies should remain secret.

    Lord Judge, the lord chief justice of England and Wales, and two other judges have allowed the newspaper to appeal.

    The appeal will be the latest stage in an eight-year battle by the newspaper to view a set of letters written by the prince to ministers in seven government departments over a nine-month period. It is due to be heard in the court of appeal later this year.’

  123. Over the next 50 years we will have two unelected Kings before the crown is handed over to George, notwithstanding unforseen events.

    It has been observed before that politicians are so crooked and incompetent that a random appointment of an ordinary person would yield a better form of representation. And another commentator (Abe Rene?) noted that royal birth is arbitrary. Many people also acknowledge that the royals are not special, not divinely chosen, but are very ordinary people who often appear to exhibit very ordinary faults. 

    So what we have, with this young prince, is a very random selection (at the point of conception) of a very ordinary person to be our head of state/s to serve as a mostly powerless figurehead and roving ambassador. In return for the service that is *imposed* on this person, from birth, he is provided with all sorts of compensation in the form of wealth and public adulation. He is also exposed to a very real risk of assassination and a life of very little privacy and rude speculation about his personal habits.

    I can understand people being irritated by anachronistic traditions and irrational public affection for people with whom they have no personal relationship. And I am supportive of those who demand financial prudence and accountability in matters related to the cost of maintaining a monarchy. 

    But I disagree with the resentment expressed at the appointment of a person to such an important position through the accident of birth. I think it is an experiment worth pursuing in the UK for the time being. Adjustments can be made to the system but it is pretty clear to many that an elected politician is not a guarantee of better representation. Don’t forget that YOU voted for Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, David Cameron in a democratic process.

  124. Jemand – Censorship Improves History 26 Jul, 2013 – 8:18 am

    “…it is an experiment worth pursuing in the UK”

    Monarchy is fairly well tested already. It’s about as unexperimental as anything can be in an ever changing world.

    “Adjustments can be made to the system”

    They have been, from decapitation to parliament.

    Personally I am surprised that Australia still has the colonial governer general retaining constitutional power even after the 1975 coup. That was political power achieved through constitutional monarchy in a way that we are promised will never happen. The same undemoctartic remnants of absolute rule allow the uk pm to take the country to war without consulting an elected body.

    “Don’t forget that YOU voted for Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, David Cameron in a democratic process”

    No I didn’t. Ok I did vote for one once but it didn’t work out and I have learnt my lesson.

  125. Jemand – Censorship Improves History 26 Jul, 2013 – 8:18 am

    “it is pretty clear to many that an elected politician is not a guarantee of better representation”

    I’m not going to argue with that. They’re as bad as each other. So, no presidents or monarchs…

  126. By coincidence I have just got a telegram from the queen on this very subject. It’s relevant so I’m sure she won’t mind me sharing:

    “My guilded carriage, lottery funded and trident secure, is in fact powered by angels. Worship excessive wealth serfs!”

  127. Sofia Kibo Noh

    26 Jul, 2013 - 2:20 pm

    “…it is an experiment…”

    What?

    How long do you have to run that experiment before you accept that it produces consistently negative results for both those ruled and for their neighbours in other regions that attract the royal ambitions?.

    From Herodotus onwards. That is from the first written “Histories it’s an endless repetition of:

    Spending lives and taxes getting large numbers of people killed for the consistent royal appetite for power and wealth.

    Squabbling, frequently lethally among themselves, sibling against parent, sibling against sibling, parent against parent. Surrounded by aristocracies who mimic royal behaviour.

    Swanning around in obscene royal splendour, often, as in the UK, when a large segment of their subjects live in poverty.

    Needing the protection of armies of hired guns and a war economy that devotes otherwise productive resources to the technologies of destruction.

    All that at 122 times greater cost than Ireland, whose electorate have chosen three sound presidents in a row. How about that for up to date experimental data?

    Isn’t it time to accept that we know the results of the “experiment” and get on with designing a more fit-for-purpose head of state?

    Economically it doesn’t take a genius to realise that, for example 8560 nurses would spend the UK monarch’s fees in ways that would have a far more beneficial effect in the wider economy than the lavish conspicuous consumption of the royals.

    But monarchy isn’t the only fish to fry.

    If monarchy is corrupting – and it is – wait till you see what overt empire does to us. Daniel Ellsberg

  128. Sofia Kibo Noh

    26 Jul, 2013 - 2:23 pm

    Oops!

    Anyone interested will have no trouble finding Herodotus’s Histories then.

  129. Hi Phil,

    The tossing out of the Whitlam government wasn’t a coup as card-carrying Oz Labor Party members claim – even Whitlam never said as much. But that’s another story.

    I could go on and explain what I meant about an experiment but I won’t. That idea apparently has little or no prospect of attracting an interested audience here.

    But I will ask this question. All fantasies of a Utopian paradise put to one side, what kind of nation or nations would Great Britain become if it becomes a republic (sans president)?

    Remember, the American colonies replaced one kind of class system with another and now pay a massive amount of money to maintain a democratically elected ruling class. Despite all of the US’s pretensions to being a welcoming land to the world’s poor, a lot of people here hold the country, its culture and its people in contempt.

  130. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!)

    26 Jul, 2013 - 5:18 pm

    @ Jemand

    Excellent posts, thank you.

    It’s also worth re-emphasising one point you make, or gently hint at : some of the very people who deplore the randomness of the ‘selection’ of the future Monarchy (“accident of birth”, “non-elected”) call for the random appointment of a Prime Minister or Head of State through a kind of lottery (“accident of lottery”, non-elected”)!

  131. Habby’s effusive praise of Jemand’s posts raised in my mind the probability that Jemand must be talking cobblers.

    So, when Jemand said:

    “The tossing out of the Whitlam government wasn’t a coup as card-carrying Oz Labor Party members claim – even Whitlam never said as much.”

    I checked, and found it just isn’t true.

    Here’s Gough, in his own words:

    But that way there could have been no ambush; and without the ambush, there could have been no coup.

    http://whitlamdismissal.com/1995/11/08/whitlam-the-coup-20-years-after.html

    So whenever you see habby praise something just check. It’s probably cobblers. When habby disses something. It’s probably safe enough.

  132. I suppose it wouldn’t make any difference if I make a post hoc qualification and say that Whitlam made no mention of his dismissal as a being coup at the time of his dismissal. The right time to make the claim, no?

    Subsequent references to the event by Gough, some 20 years later, as a ‘coup’ seem a little belated and revisionist, don’t you think, Herbie?

    And was it really a coup as we understand it to mean (in the dictionary) when we see real coups in nice places like Africa and Asia? Or was it really just a shabby exercise in an ambitious arsehole (Malcom Fraser)  taking advantage of an opportunity to oust an unpopular and incompetent government led by the oh-so modest Gough Whitlam (pbuh)?

    When it comes to Oz politics, I certainly need no lessons from amateurs.

  133. Jemand

    “Subsequent references to the event by Gough, some 20 years later, as a ‘coup’ seem a little belated and revisionist, don’t you think, Herbie?”

    No. I think 20 years after an event we’d all be better informed, including Gough. That’s generally the case, for fairly obvious reasons.

    “When it comes to Oz politics, I certainly need no lessons from amateurs.”

    And yet, it seems you do.

  134. Oh touche, Herbie. I’m honoured by your scholarship.

  135. No worries, Jemand.

    So long as the customer is happy, I’m happy.

    Anyway, Jemand, come across any other big transitional events in the western political world during the 1970s that might inform a view of these events in Oz?

  136. Habbabkuk (La vita è bella!)

    26 Jul, 2013 - 9:50 pm

    @ Herbie

    “So long as the customer is happy, I’m happy.”
    ______________-

    Who are your customers, Herbie?

  137. Did somebody mention something about a baby:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfXMflQLGIA

  138. Hilarious, JimmyG.

    I think that was Fedup’s youtube salute to news of the new prince’s arrival.

  139. Flaming June

    27 Jul, 2013 - 8:14 am

    Extra! Extra! Wee royal babe will boost economy.

    That’ll be sales of £100 Britax car seats, £45 a pop merino shawls, Aden & Anais muslin wraps £40 for 4 and oh yes! commemorative pottery. The wee babe’s mother was wearing a one off designer dress so that won’t count.

    Royal Baby: George Gives UK Business Boost

    The Royal birth has already helped sales for some retailers, with predictions that Prince George could add £250m to the economy.
    http://news.sky.com/story/1120984/royal-baby-george-gives-uk-business-boost

  140. Flaming June

    27 Jul, 2013 - 8:21 am

    The wild colonial boy is wrong.
    ‘Don’t forget that YOU voted for Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, David Cameron in a democratic process.’

    Me neither Phil.

  141. Flaming June

    27 Jul, 2013 - 9:11 am

    It gets worse.

    Kate parents’ cabbie: ‘Jaw hit the floor’
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-23452815

    “It is unbelievable,” she added. “Not in a million years would I have ever thought I’d be picking up someone like that.”

    “If I knew, I would have done something with my hair, put my make-up on and made myself a bit more presentable,” she said.

    ~~~

    Hope ‘Carole’ gave her a big tip. She can afford it.

    The ghetto families on 10p an hour making party gifts for Kate’s mum’s £30million business empire
    The Middleton’s business Party Pieces is among companies who sell pinatas made by workers who are paid as little as 10p an hour
    The business said they would urgently investigate the conditions

    Monica Villegas works 10 hours a day, seven days a week and gets her daughter, 5, and son, 18 to help her.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2283104/Kate-Middletons-family-business-The-ghetto-families-10p-hour-making-party-gifts-Carole-Middletons-30m-business-empire-Party-Pieces.html

  142. Well it’s funny how people are reluctant to admit to having voted for their political heads of state. How did they come to office if not by a (so-called) democratic process?

    Maybe democracy is only celebrated by winners.

  143. Jemand – Censorship Improves History 26 Jul, 2013 – 3:08 pm
    “All fantasies of a Utopian paradise put to one side, what kind of nation or nations would Great Britain become if it becomes a republic (sans president)?”

    I would welcome a republic and then struggle to be free of the president. Never happy some people.

  144. Jemand – sorry I misread your question before posting above.

    I do not think a monarchy/president free society is fantasy. Granted, these leader things do seem very popular nowadays but that is changing. In the meantime I would prefer elected representatives to queenie. It’s a step in the right direction.

  145. Phil, your (preferred?) minimalist system (mine too) is of slicing off the head, figuratively speaking, the current system and, I guess, transferring residual powers to a kind of constitutional court which resolves unexpected legal problems at that level.

    That’s a fair and reasonable form of republican model, that I support. Although I’d still have my roving Ambassador General go around the world smiling and shaking hands as a figurehead, oiling the machinery of sleazy international political dealings.

    But my question was about what kind of Britain would result without the expected dreaming of a land in which everyone is happy and working and holding hands and where other nations do not fear Britain but see it as benign and friendly – like the way poor people in shitty countries see tourists… before they stab them.

    For example, the class system would shape shift, but into what? The aristocracy would redefine themselves and maintain their privileges. Money and power would still rule the day. But the UK would also lose a lot of its international prestige along with its name (UK), as much as people will scoff at the idea. Image counts for a lot in terms of fear and respect. Without either, one outcome will be a decline (small or large?) in British clout in political representations. Let’s not kid ourselves here, and I’m sure you don’t – the world plays hard ball and a power in decline, like the UK, needs everthing it’s got in its favour, to have a fighting chance.

    Oz can certainly go down the republican route with fewer concerns because we don’t really get any benefit of having a British monarch as our head of state, especially when dealing with those shabby crooks in other Commonwealth countries. It doesn’t lend us any advantage for the purposes of negotiations. But the UK does have that advantage.

    There are so many little details that need to be considered that are probably unworthy of discussion on this, or any forum. One is the cost savings of booting the royals out of the palaces. That sounds good but what happens to the palaces? Are they razed to accomodate construction of housing for the poor? Are they maintained as museums for fee paying Japanese and Chinese tourists or memorials for nostalgic working class people who still own commemoration Chuck and Dianne coffee mugs? I’d like to find a good website that goes over the cost/benefit analysis of pros and cons of retaining the monarchy(for the UK).

  146. Cromwell abolished Christmas.

    Don’t want to be making the same mistakes again.

  147. James Chater

    28 Jul, 2013 - 4:25 pm

    I am an Englishman living in France. When in the UK I am a republican; when in France a monarchist – at least, I want to abolish the 5th Republic, and if becoming a monarchy is what it takes, I am prepared to pay the price. Therefore, my fellow-Britains, send us your unwanted royals! Their ancestors continued to claim the throne of France right up to the time of Queen Elizabeth I, so this would be a chance for them to “come back”!

  148. “I am an Englishman living in France.”

    a.k.a. the least popular bloke in the village.

  149. @Fred “It can’t answer back”.

    “It”!!

    He can’t read either…

    (unless the lizard rumours…)

  150. The old girl’s laughing in our faces, again. Who paid? Us probably.

    ‘It is not known precisely which Champagne was served during the celebrations but Bollinger, Laurent-Perrier, GH Mumm, Louis Roederer, Pol Roger and Veuve Cliquot are all royal warrant holders to supply Champagne to the British royal family.’

    5http://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2013/07/queen-treats-staff-to-free-champagne/

  151. Any significance to this story being on the same page do you think?

    http://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2013/07/police-investigate-audacious-champagne-theft/

  152. Flaming June

    29 Jul, 2013 - 6:02 pm

    Kempe I like the way Champagne is spelt rather reverentially on that site with a capital ‘C’ (after the region I suppose) and the location of the theft – Ratty’s Lane!

  153. Villager opined:
    Very telling that you made no observation about that, Buddhist or not.
    I did. It was, “FACT”. In response to your offered dichotomy. I’ll say it again: FICTION.

    Try a bit of honest constant awareness instead of your various escapes. Life is lived and understood through its actuality of action, not by playing with some theories however appealing and romantic you may believe them to be.

    Thank you so much for your advice. Please tell me what is to be understood about life? And what if one’s actuality of action consists of playing with theories?

    Read Daisetz Suzuki for an insight, if you’re having trouble here.

  154. Flaming June

    31 Jul, 2013 - 1:17 pm

    Such a caring employer.

    Buckingham Palace uses zero-hours contracts for summer staff
    The 350 part-time workers deployed during summer opening of royal family’s London residence have no guaranteed work

    http://www.theguardian.com/money/2013/jul/30/buckingham-palace-zero-hours-contracts?CMP=twt_gu

    and

    Army of workers trapped in insecure, badly-paid ‘jobs’
    Zero-hours contracts tie employees to on-call working and have become part of the efficiency drive in the public sector

    http://www.theguardian.com/money/2013/jul/30/army-workers-zero-hours-contracts

    ~~

    Badar Azim gets the push.

    Royal baby footman returns home after visa expires
    http://metro.co.uk/2013/07/30/royal-baby-footman-returns-home-after-visa-expires-3904449/

  155. Flaming June

    2 Aug, 2013 - 2:25 pm

    Occupation – Prince of the United Kingdom LOL

    http://news.sky.com/story/1123724/royal-couple-formally-register-prince-george

    Why didn’t he say ‘air sea rescue helicopter pilot’ or ‘RAF officer’ or something meaningful?

  156. “… and the one member of the family who’d make a decent monarch, IMO,” Komodo.

    You must prefer Red Queens or perhaps, barnet-headed dominatrices in general. Princess Anne is probably the only member of the current House of Windsor whom one actually can imagine yelling, “Off with their heads!” and “Let them eat limousines!”.

  157. (I always have trouble with these tricky person checks)…
    Yes, ‘privileged’ is rather an odd first name and I suppose my own suggestion (‘psychopathic’) was no better, but I was focussed on the idea that he would probably take after his uncle Harry, who has a penchant for flying around in helicopters playing reality-computer-games killing Afghans with his joy-stick.
    But yes, terrible way to amuse ourselves, speculating on the probable character of an innocent child who can’t defend himself.

  158. “Cromwell abolished Christmas,” Fred, 9:39am, 28.7.13.

    We’re not in C17th any more. I have nothing against Jesus. Jesus is just alright by me. And so are Christmas, tinsel, carols and so on. And the baby is fine. And I don’t mind the Fat Man in Red (after all, he is in red, though originally he was in green). I just want rid of the monarchy and aristocracy. Or are you suggesting that the monarch is God’s representative on earth and the aristocracy, the angelic host incarnate?

    All power to babies! Down with the Crown!

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